Blackpool man feared he would be ‘kidnapped and murdered’ before being found dead at home

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“This case is an illustration of the difficulties faced in relation to mental health issues.”

The inquest was opened at Blackpool Town Hall.

The inquest was opened at Blackpool Town Hall. (Image: Andrew Teebay/Liverpool Echo)

A Lancashire man had paranoid thoughts which led him to believe that he was going to be kidnapped and murdered in the weeks before his death.

Mark Matthew Bogan, who had a history of diagnosed depression, anxiety, and paranoia, was found dead by his mother at their shared home in Blackpool, on January 31 this year.

The 34-year-old expressed fears that someone was going to harm him, telling a crisis team in January 2021 that he believed someone was going to kidnap him.

Mr Bogan had a history of threatening to harm himself and, when appearing in court in December 2020 for breaching the peace, appeared to mime hanging himself with an invisible rope.

At an inquest hearing, held today (June 15), at Blackpool Coroner’s Court, it was concluded that Mr Bogan had died by misadventure after taking a large dose of medication.

Mr Bogan’s mother Amanda Bogan attended the inquest hearing.

“We have here a clearly incredibly supportive mother who has explained clearly in court that we are dealing with a pattern of events that are along these lines; that during the later stages of last year, this man had issues with his mental health.”

“Considering the evidence I don’t believe it would be appropriate to return a conclusion of suicide.

“I’m going to return a misadventure conclusion, Mark has deliberately taken the tablets but I don’t believe he intended to die as a result of doing that.”

Mr Bogan was born November 13, 1986, in Blackpool and was later diagnosed with several mental health issues which appeared to intensify as 2020 drew to a close.

He lived with his mother in Stoke Lane, Blackpool, and had previously shared his paranoid thoughts with Mrs Bogan.

Mr Bogan believed that someone could communicate with him through the walls of the house and feared that they were going to “kill him, rape him, and get him.”

In October, he was admitted to hospital having attempted to take his own life and, on December 28, he was arrested for a breach of the peace in which he threatened to harm himself.

The following day he attended Blackpool Magistrates Court via video link where he was said to have mimed hanging himself with an invisible noose.

He later told NHS workers who were assessing him for mental health issues following his arrest, that he was just being “silly.”

Mr Bogan later contacted the crisis team at North Lancashire and South Cumbria NHS trust and appointments were made for him to speak with mental health workers January.

Although Mr Bogan had a history of mental health issues and self harm, he was said to be stable during January, having undergone assessments with mental health workers.

Mrs Bogan told the court that her son seemed to be doing well until the latter stages of January when lockdown, and his inability to exercise at the gym, caused his mood to dip once again.

He contacted the mental health services again saying that his mood was low, his thoughts were racing and his sleep was disturbed.

Mr Bogan also expressed concerns that someone was going to kidnap him; a fear that was put down to paranoid thinking.

On January 30, Mr Bogan drove to his girlfriend’s work place in Chorley, picked her up, and then returned to his home in Blackpool.

The couple had an argument which resulted in Mr Bogan’s partner returning home.

Mr Bogan then entered his house alone at 11.30pm, in an agitated state. Toxicology reports later showed that he had been drinking.

According to police reports, based on Mrs Bogan’s testimony; her son had been “ranting and raving” and “saying he was going to cut himself.”

He also threatened to take his own life and sent pictures of medicine blister packs to his girlfriend and mother.

Mrs Bogan told the court the threats were nothing new, her son often made such threats when he was intoxicated.

Mr Wilson said: “Mrs Bogan had then gone to bed, not expecting events to unfold in the way that they did.”

The next morning, January 31, at 11.45am, Mrs Bogan found her son unresponsive in bed.

Paramedics and police were called to the scene, and Mr Bogan was pronounced dead.

Mr Wilson returned a death by misadventure conclusion, saying that, despite Mr Bogan’s threats and actions, he had not intended to kill himself, he had made similar threats before and not taken action.