Category Archives: Local

Mental health of kids in Blackpool improved with dogs, horses and therapy

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Blackpool was one of six areas in the country chosen to take part in the programme

 

A general view of Blackpool from above
A general view of Blackpool from above (Image: Getty)

A multi million pound project to boost the mental wellbeing of Blackpool children has improved outcomes for thousands of youngsters, according to a new report.

The HeadStart programme is due to come to an end in July this year after being awarded £10m of National Lottery funding in 2016.

Operating under the banner of the Resilience Revolution, it has forged partnerships with all 44 schools in the town, and worked with another Lottery funded scheme BetterStart which is aimed at pre-school children.

Blackpool was one of six areas nationally chosen to take part in the programme to develop a community approach to supporting mental health among young people.

Since its inception, HeadStart has provided nearly 77,000 opportunities for youngsters aged between 10 and 16 to take part in resilience building activities.

These have ranged from providing therapy dogs in schools, using horse riding to improve self esteem and walk and talk therapy to provide an alternative form of counselling to children at risk of self-harm.

The scheme has also seen the launch of the Blackpool Beating Bullying campaign which has gained national recognition.

A report being presented to a special meeting of Blackpool Council’s children and young people’s scrutiny committee on Wednesday (January 12), says it was ” found that young people who are engaged in activities fare better than
expected.”

This includes those “facing complex disadvantages” who have benefited from targeted intervention.

Outcomes have included better support for children who self-harm, and fewer pupils being excluded from school.

The report says since HeadStart was launched, 99.5 per cent of
young people receiving a targeted Resilience Revolution (RR) intervention have not been permanently excluded from school.

In addition 82 per cent of young people have not returned to A&E with self-harm injuries or risks since receiving specialist support from the resilience coaches.

The report adds: “Our report shows a wealth of evidence that all
aspects of life – family, friends, school, and career – have been transformed
with enhanced relationships, renewed aspirations, and increased learning
opportunities.”

It is now hoped to continue the work started by Headstart once the funding ends.

The report says: “Our next challenge, in the final phase of the HeadStart programme, is to build a legacy that will enable the successful areas of the RR to continue once the funding has ceased.”

 

 

 

Washing machine goes up in flames inside Cleveleys commercial building

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Four fire engines were called to extinguish a washing machine after it went up in flames in Cleveleys.

Firefighters from Bispham, Blackpool, and Fleetwood were called to a commercial building in Warren Drive at around 3.35 am today (January 29).

Crews discovered a washing machine well alight inside the storeroom of the property when they arrived.

Firefighters equipped with four breathing apparatus used two hose reels to extinguish the flames.

Four fire engines were called to extinguish a washing machine in Warren Drive

Four fire engines were called to extinguish a washing machine in Warren Drive

The fire service reported no injuries.

Crews were at the scene for approximately 40 minutes.

 

 

From winter walks to getting closer to nature – these events across Wyre explore the great outdoors

Home | Blackpool Gazette

January has kicked off with every opportunity to get out and about in Wyre, blow off the cobwebs and keep moving as the winter draws on.

Wyre Council has launched its activities for the great outdoors and there’s a packed agenda with something for everyone.

On Monday, join a team of enthusiastic beach cleaners to give Rossall Beach a tidy-up. It’s a rewarding morning looking after the environment. No need to book for this one – meet at Rossall promenade, Cleveleys near the flag pole at 9.30am.

There’s a long walk planned for January 14 across the fields and lanes of the Wyre Estuary. It starts at 10.30am at River Road and takes in the views of the river as it meanders up stream. You will have to book and it’s £4, £3 for concessions. Call 01995 602125 or email garstangtic@wyre.gov.uk.

Beach cleans such as this are part of a host of outdoor events in Wyre this January

Beach cleans such as this are part of a host of outdoor events in Wyre this January

On January 16, there’s a winter bird watching event at Rossall Point Tower. This takes place from 10am to 11am.

The Walking Wyre group is out and about frequently throughout January including on the 22nd with a stroll in Fleetwood along the seafront. This is an afternoon event starting at The Esplanade at 1.30pm.

Also on January 22 is an Ecology Day with Dr Alan Bedford. It’s an introduction to invertebrates including identification and recording, photography and microscopy. It’s £5 for RSB members and £10 for non members, children can go free accompanied by an adult. It’s in Thornton and more details will be given when booking – email elisabethallouis@hotmail.co.uk Price includes use of equipment, refreshments and buffet lunch. It takes place from 10am to 5pm.

The Big Garden Birdwatch rounds off an active month on January 29 and 30 and in between there are science workshops at The Mount in Fleetwood, conservation days and lots of almost daily activities. Visit the activities listings HERE

 

‘No plans to tarmac parts of Lytham Green for car parking’

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A consultation on parking which closes this weekend is not a ‘back-door’ attempt to tarmac part of Lytham Green.

That’s the categorical message from a leading Fylde councillor following social media speculation that treasured grassland on Lytham’s waterfront jewel could be lost to accommodate more cars.

The firm assurance comes after a social media claim that the consultation, which closes on Sunday night, could result in further permanent car parks on The Green, in addition to the two current ones, which are effectively extensions of Bath Street and Dicconson Terrace.

The Green has been used in recent times, including last summer, for parking on the grass but that has been strictly reserved for special events, as designated by the council.

Fylde Council's Bath Street car park in Lytham

Fylde Council’s Bath Street car park in Lytham

“The consultation is purely inviting views on all aspects of parking in Lytham to help us plan for the future,” said Coun Roger Small, chairman of the council’s operational management committee as well as being deputy leader.

“It’s a completely open agenda, with all views welcome from all those affected, but further tarmac on The Green is categorically not an option.

“We actually couldn’t do that if we wanted to, as it is covered by a covenant, but there is certainly no desire to do that anyway, and this consultation is not a ‘back door’ attempt to bring that about.

The consultation is available to contribute to on line until midnight on Sunday, January 9 and is at www.fylde.gov.uk/consultation

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New calls to sort out eyesore shop in heart of Fleetwood

Home | Blackpool Gazette

It was once the jewel in the crown on Fleetwood’s high street but the town’s biggest shop lies empty and has become the worst eyesore in the town centre.

 

The grim-looking shopfront of the former Store Twenty One premises on Lord Street in Fleetwood.

The grim-looking shopfront of the former Store Twenty One premises on Lord Street in Fleetwood.

The former Store Twenty One building, on Lord Street, has been empty since 2016 and its condition has continued to deteriorate, despite once housing Fleetwood’s most cherished shop, the Marks and Spencer store, until the mid 1980s.

Many in the town are still under the impression that is owned by the high street chain but it is understood to be owned by a Salford-based charity which has has a faith background.

Various attempts have been made over recent years to get the owners to tidy up the site but nothing has worked.

The former Store Twenty One shop on Lord Street in Fleetwood

The former Store Twenty One shop on Lord Street in Fleetwood

On separate occasions there have been two potentially fatal incidents, one involving an open window being ripped off by the wind and crashing to the ground below, the other involving a rusty sign also falling onto the pavement.

On another occasion a huge cannabis factory was found to be growing there and a man found tending it was discovered to be the victim of modern slavery.

Terry Rogers, former chairman of Fleetwood Town Council and now chairman of Fleetwood Festival of Transport, wants to see organisations make a concerted effort in 2022 to solve the problem, and said: “It’s an abomination that this building has been allowed to be left like that.

“It really lets the town down and I don’t think it would be tolerated in Cleveleys or Poulton. I feel like covering it in a shroud because it is embarrassing. We need to address it this year.”

 

 

£10m mental health project has ‘transformed’ lives in Blackpool

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A multi million pound project to boost the mental wellbeing of Blackpool children has improved outcomes for thousands of youngsters, according to a new report.

 

The HeadStart programme is due to come to an end in July this year after being awarded £10m of National Lottery funding in 2016.

Operating under the banner of the Resilience Revolution, it has forged partnerships with all 44 schools in the town, and worked with another Lottery funded scheme BetterStart which is aimed at pre-school children.

Blackpool was one of six areas nationally chosen to take part in the programme to develop a community approach to supporting mental health among young people.

The funding announcement in 2016

The funding announcement in 2016

Since its inception, HeadStart has provided nearly 77,000 opportunities for youngsters aged between 10 and 16 to take part in resilience building activities.

These have ranged from providing therapy dogs in schools, using horse riding to improve self esteem and walk and talk therapy to provide an alternative form of counselling to children at risk of self-harm.

The scheme has also seen the launch of the Blackpool Beating Bullying campaign which has gained national recognition.

A report being presented to a special meeting of Blackpool Council’s children and young people’s scrutiny committee on Wednesday (January 12), says it was ” found that young people who are engaged in activities fare better than expected.”

This includes those “facing complex disadvantages” who have benefited from targeted intervention.

Outcomes have included better support for children who self-harm, and fewer pupils being excluded from school.

The report says since HeadStart was launched, 99.5 per cent of young people receiving a targeted Resilience Revolution (RR) intervention have not been permanently excluded from school.

In addition 82 per cent of young people have not returned to A&E with self-harm injuries or risks since receiving specialist support from the resilience coaches.

The report adds: “Our report shows a wealth of evidence that all aspects of life – family, friends, school, and career – have been transformed with enhanced relationships, renewed aspirations, and increased learning opportunities.”

It is now hoped to continue the work started by Headstart once the funding ends.

The report says: “Our next challenge, in the final phase of the HeadStart programme, is to build a legacy that will enable the successful areas of the RR to continue once the funding has ceased.”

 

 

Deadline is looming for you to have your say about parking in Lytham

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Time is running out to express your views on car parking arrangements in Lytham in an online survey by Fylde Council.

Residents and visitors are being invited to have their say on their parking preferences, concerns, and suggestions.

The data will then be used to inform future developments regarding parking facilities to support the town and wider area, subject to normal planning approval.

The survey, which closes at midnight on Sunday, January 9, focuses primarily on off-street parking – public car parks – which Fylde Council operates, but any opinions regarding on-street parking can also be presented and will be passed to Lancashire County Council, which is responsible for that.

Deadline for the survey is midnight on Sunday

Deadline for the survey is midnight on Sunday

Coun Roger Small, chairman of the Fylde Council’s operational management committee, said: “Fylde Council strives to ensure that residents, businesses, shoppers, visitors, and workers have access to sufficient, good quality, safe and welcoming parking provision.

“Lytham boasts a wealth of delightful amenities and attractions to appeal to residents and visitors alike.

“This survey is the first step in the process to ensure our beautiful town can continue to be conveniently enjoyed by generations to come.”

The Fylde Council survey is at www.fylde.gov.uk/council/consultation/

It is thanks to our loyal readers that we can continue to provide the trusted news, analysis and insight that matters to you. For unlimited access to our unrivalled local reporting, you can take out a subscription here and help support the work of our dedicated team of reporters.

 

Lottery grant joy for Blackpool park

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A Blackpool park has clinched a National Lottery grant of almost £10,000 which will be used to install wheelchair-friendly play equipment.

The funding has been awarded to the Friends of East Pines Park in Anchorsholme, where work will begin this spring on the third phase of redevelopment.

The money will be used to install a wheelchair-friendly roundabout which will be the playground’s first wheelchair-friendly piece of equipment.

Phase three of investment will also see the playground railings painted blue and tangerine by volunteers to make it an even more inviting space.

The playground at East Pines ParkThe playground at East Pines Park

Chairman of the Friends of East Pines Park Coun Paul Galley said: “We are so grateful to the Lottery for backing us with this project.

“The roundabout will make our playground and park a place for children of all physical abilities to feel valued and most of all enjoy. This in turn will allow more families to enjoy the benefits of being in a great green space.”

The previous two phases of work have included the installation of a new play ship, swings, slide and new tarmac surfacing including a world map.

The friends group has raised more than £75,000 for the three phases since 2015 as part of a wider £150,000 raised for the rest of the park in that time.

Funding has included a £4,000 grant from the Swallowdale Children’s Trust as part of a community competition run by The Gazette.

Two years ago a grant of £16,000 was also received from an anonymous benefactor to install the new slide and safety surface and resurface the base of the playground.

Anyone interested in volunteering to join the painting team at the playground can contact Coun Galley on 07904 12161 or email paul.galley@blackpool.gov.uk

 

When will Lancashire mornings start to get lighter? Here’s everything you need to know

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Nobody likes getting up in the pitch black and freezing cold and one question on everyone’s lips is ‘when will the mornings start to get lighter?’

Winter is great … for so long. But everyone needs their daily dose of Vitamin D and it’s difficult to get if you are working from home all day with dark mornings and even darker evenings.

So here’s everything you need to know about the lighter, brighter days ahead …

With the Winter Solstice marking the shortest day of 2021 on December 21 last year and only eight hours of sunlight in the UK, the mornings will already be getting slightly lighter – even if they still appear to be quite dark and gloomy.

Lighter mornings are on their way in Lancashire

Lighter mornings are on their way in Lancashire

After the Winter Solstice, days begin to increase in length by approximately two minutes and seven seconds every day.

This means that by January 18, and every four weeks after this date, we should see an additional hour of daylight.

Evenings will start to get lighter as they gradually shift to become equal in length to mornings – a process which officially takes place on the Spring Equinox.

The Spring Equinox will see both mornings and evenings last for roughly 12 hours each from Sunday, March 20. The clocks go forward to move us into British Summer Time on Sunday, March 27.

The clocks go forward to British Summer Time on Sunday, March 27

The clocks go forward to British Summer Time on Sunday, March 27

After this point, we will see lighter days and evenings as we approach the Summer Solstice, which falls in late June and marks the longest day and shortest night.

Then it’s time to fire up the BBQ!

Roll on summer!

 

Blackpool hits back over ’14th worst place to live in England’ claims

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Blackpool has appeared on another ‘worst’ list but supporters of the town have hit back at new claims that it is the 14th worst place to live in England.

 

Blackpool Tower is one of the nation's top landmarks

Blackpool Tower is one of the nation’s top landmarks

The town, which remains Britain’s number one seaside resort, appeared on the ’50 worst towns/cities in England’ list published online by satirical website I Live Here.

Blackpool was just above 15th placed Blackburn, although only a few derogatory words explained why the town was high on the list .

Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire surprisingly topped the unenviable chart.

Blackpool's green gem, Stanley Park

Blackpool’s green gem, Stanley Park

Although the resort does have its deprived areas and like any town has its problems, Blackpool remains much loved across the nation and residents say there are plenty of good reasons to live here.

Prior to the Covid pandemic, figures from Visit Britain placed Blackpool as the UK’s top seaside destination, with 8.6 million day visits generating, spending of £406m.

And last year even greater numbers came to Blackpool, with many vowing to return, after giving foreign holidays the chop because of Covid.

Along with well known attractions such as the Pleasure Beach, the unique Blackpool Tower complex, the Sandcastle Water Park, the Sealife Centre, the theatres with varied shows and events, no less than three piers and of course, the famous Illuminations, the town is proud of its miles of golden sand.

Making the most of Blackpool's golden sand, in front of Central Pier

Making the most of Blackpool’s golden sand, in front of Central Pier

Blackpool boasts a unique seafront tramway which is an attraction in its own right, Grade II-listed Stanley Park with its new BMX trail and beautiful flower gardens, the Marton Mere Nature Reserve and, as many have attested, a still thriving community spirit.

https://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/news/world-tourism-day-blackpool-and-the-fylde-coasts-best-attractions-that-most-visitors-wont-know-about-according-to-you-3397763

Claire Smith, from hoteliers association Stay Blackpool, said: “I have lived here all my life and I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

“I take these silly surveys with a pinch of salt.

“There is always something going on in Blackpool and something to do, and a lot of them are free.

Claire Smith, of Stay Blackpool, is a firm champion of the resort

Claire Smith, of Stay Blackpool, is a firm champion of the resort

“How can you knock a town that gets so many visitors and is the number one seaside attraction year after year?

“Every town has its problems and there is always someone who is unhappy with their lot in life, no matter where they are, but we have so much here in the town itself, in nearby places like Lytham and Fleetwood.

“We still have a great community spirit here, demonstrated all the time by the people who actually live here.

“And our location is perfect, so close to the vibrant cities of Liverpool and Manchester and the Lake District.”

Paul Dewick-Day of the Bella Vista Lodge guesthouse on Havelock Street, said: “Blackpool is a fantastic place to live, wok and visit.

“The money that is being invested in the town at the moment is really encouraging.

“Last year a lot of visitors who haven’t been to Blackpool in ages came back here.

“And speaking personally, many of them will be coming back because they realised what they were missing.

“The numbers speak for themselves.”

Claire Smith added: “I take these silly surveys with a pinch of salt!”

 

Who has come out on top in the Lancashire council logo league?

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Lancashire’s councils have received a dressing down – over the design of their logos.

 

With a few notable exceptions, the county performed poorly in a nationwide countdown of council corporate imagery, compiled by graphic designer Robin Wilde.

Preston City Council’s emblem – featuring the city’s distinctive coat of arms, with its instantly recognisable lamb – was higher-placed than any of its county counterparts, emerging in 69th spot out of 403 UK local authorities.

Neighbouring Fylde came close to claiming the Lancashire council logo crown, with the district’s windmill design coming out just a few places short of Preston at number 74 in the niche league – which has proved a surprise viral hit.

The top four council logos in Lancashire according to a graphic designer's assessment - Preston City Council (#1), Fylde Council (#2), Wyre Council (#3) and Blackpool Council (#4)

The top four council logos in Lancashire according to a graphic designer’s assessment – Preston City Council (#1), Fylde Council (#2), Wyre Council (#3) and Blackpool Council (#4)

However, that is where the good news ends for the county as a whole. In spite of boasting 15 councils within its administrative borders – giving Lancashire plenty of representation in this most unlikely of local authority league tables – the majority of them have ended up in the lower half of the branding chart.

Three Lancashire councils – Hyndburn, South Ribble and Blackburn with Darwen – found themselves in the bottom 50. But even higher-ranked authorities were not spared the occasionally caustic commentary that accompanied the logo list, which Robin admits should not be taken “too literally”.

As the biggest authority in the region, Lancashire County Council, at least managed to achieve a place in top half of the table, at number 182 – but its lettering was nevertheless lambasted as looking like it had been “made of gelatine and then sucked on for half an hour”.

Speaking to the Local Democracy Reporting Service (LDRS), Robin acknowledges that Lancashire “doesn’t come off too well” in his rankings – and explains why the council imagery used by Preston and Fylde caught his eye.

Lancashire County Council (#5), Ribble Valley Borough Council (#6), Pendle Council (#7) and Lancaster City Council (#8)

Lancashire County Council (#5), Ribble Valley Borough Council (#6), Pendle Council (#7) and Lancaster City Council (#8)

“I think the connecting factor [that sees them] performing pretty well is that they’ve both taken fairly traditional imagery and put them through contemporary design principles – that is, they’ve worked hard to condense them down to their key features and, in doing so, have created a logo that can serve usefully in the full range of functions the council might need to use it for.

“That’s something traditional imagery can help you with, in that it gives you a starting point – but if you’re too cautious you can be held back by not wanting to change it. I like that they’ve been a bit bold,” said Robin, who is also a freelance writer.

He says that the Lancashire councils whose imagery ignited his ire have generally committed one of two opposing design sins.

“In most cases it’s either a lack of ingenuity – the logo is boring – or overambition – the logo tries to do too much.

Rossendale Borough Council (#9), Burnley Council (#10), West Lancashire Borough Council (11) and Chorley Council (#12)

Rossendale Borough Council (#9), Burnley Council (#10), West Lancashire Borough Council (11) and Chorley Council (#12)

“Most of the problems with the low-ranked logos come from a lack of confidence. It comes across sometimes as though councils aren’t sure people will ‘get it’ if they use something simple, so that’s where you get slogans and crests and extra text awkwardly jammed in, with the result that the effect is lost.

“If you look at the logos which did best, they have a bold and confident sense of themselves.

Some of this might be that the Lancashire identity is still a bit wounded from the 1974 reorganisation and the loss of Manchester and much of Merseyside, which has left the local authorities feeling a bit rootless.

“Compare them to Bedford, the best performing logo on the list, which has had a charter since 1166 and been a municipal borough since 1835, and consequently has a really strong sense of itself which it can proclaim quite boldly. York, which comes in second, is in a similar situation.

Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council (#13), South Ribble Borough Council (#14) and Hyndburn Council (#15)

Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council (#13), South Ribble Borough Council (#14) and Hyndburn Council (#15)

“Of course, I wouldn’t take these rankings too literally – had I known 60,000 people would end up reading them, I might have put a bit more care into getting them in the right order rather than going for gags.

“I think it does try to get across an important point, though – which is that this is a bit of design we see very frequently from very early in life. Everyone grows up knowing the symbol on their wheelie bins or the libraries.

“But even though having a culture of design in local councils can be really helpful for making services work well, it’s something people don’t think about.

“The logos don’t matter really, they’re just the tip of the iceberg – but having the capacity to do good design can really affect people’s quality of life in a council area,” Robin added.

The LDRS asked all of Lancashire’s local authorities for their reaction to where they were placed in Robin’s rundown – here is his candid assessment and, where they responded, what the councils had to say about how their branding has been branded.

No. 384 (#15 in Lancs) – Hyndburn Borough Council

Robin: “I like the honesty of a sign that tells the truth about the emotions associated with a place and, on that measure, Hyndburn does not pass the test. I can imagine circumstances in which waking up in Accrington might be a blessed relief, but only if you’d previously had a bag put over your head and been knocked out with a cosh. I would also advise them on the necessity of punctuation. Hyndburn might be “the place to be an excellent council” but it’s suspiciously circumspect about the council they’ve already got. Also, mega-complicated crest plus modern fonts = no.

Council leader Miles Parkinson: “I did enjoy reading this article and applaud the extensive time and dedication it must have taken to compile. I would like to congratulate our Lancashire neighbours on their positions – it seems for us in Hyndburn, the only way is up! Commiserations to our ‘almost’ neighbours in Bury, they definitely did not deserve second-to-last place and overall, the North has certainly got a raw deal on this list.

“Whilst I would agree our logo is not the best in the land, I do disagree with the low position. We merge the old with the new, with a crest to represent our rich heritage. I would happily offer a tour of Hyndburn to the writer and show them first-hand why we are the place to be. Hyndburn includes many towns in addition to Accrington and hosts attractions such as the largest Tiffany glass collection in Europe and the highest number of green flag certified parks for any local authority in Lancashire.”

No. 360 (#14 in Lancs) – South Ribble Borough Council

Robin: “The new South Ribble logo was introduced in November last year and apparently has been embroiled in a “too modern” row, which tells you all you need to know about Northerners. It’s a nice attempt at reworking the crest and text cliché into something serviceable, but suffers from too many colours and the shoehorned Lancashire rose. However, it’s a damn sight better than the old one, so press ahead, I reckon.”

Speaking to the LDRS, Robin later added that a second glance was making him look upon the borough’s revamped imagery – which was designed in-house by the council and put out to public consultation in 2020 – “a bit more fondly”

He added: “Its main problem is that it’s stuck halfway between old fashioned and modern – and needs to commit either way to make sense as a visual identity.”

Council leader Paul Foster: “Everyone’s entitled to their own opinion but we’re really happy with our new logo. At least we’re all agreed it’s a major improvement on our old one. The previous logo had been in use for a long time and wasn’t fit for purpose, as our logo is now used across all sorts of different platforms – particularly with the growth of digital technology.

“We asked our residents what they wanted to see in a new design and, as well as creating something fresh for the future, it was also important to us to recognise our past and our rich heritage. We’ve kept elements from the old borough coat of arms and given them a modern twist, while we’ve included the Lancashire rose as an unmistakable symbol of the county we’re proudly at the heart of.

“The new brand has completely transformed how the council is presented and this matches with our ambitious programme to deliver major improvements for the people of South Ribble – including a £25 million revamp of Leyland town centre, the creation of affordable housing for local people, and major events such as next summer’s Music in the Park.

“We’re also glad it’s got people talking and we’re delighted to have had some fantastic feedback – even if there is no accounting for some people’s tastes!”

No. 352 (#13 in Lancs) – Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council

Robin: “This is an awkward council name to begin with, so why draw attention to it with that handwritten “with”? Blue and green, again, but at least in dark enough shades they don’t clash too horribly. Meh.”

No. 347 (#12 in Lancs) – Chorley Council

Robin: “I once applied to work for Chorley council and they never returned my application email, so marks off for that. I joke, but this is still very unremarkable but for the molten lava bubble in the middle.”

Council leader Alistair Bradley: “It was fun to see how all the councils fared, but it’s not a popularity contest – the logo is there to ensure our residents can see what the council is doing for them in their community and reflects our solid core values.

“A brand is much more than the logo on its own – it is how you are perceived and valued in your community and what residents tell us is that the council is a community leader and is very proactive in making Chorley a great place to live, work and visit.

“It was interesting to hear Robin admit he is a bit biased given that he applied for a job with Chorley Council and didn’t get it. It just shows that everyone wants to be part of what we do here in the borough and perhaps he can apply again with some great new ideas for us in the future.”

No. 316 (#11 in Lancs) – West Lancashire Borough Council

Robin: “Get in the landfill with the rest.”

Council spokesperson: “We are very proud of our council crest, which appears on our publications, signs, and vehicles and features references to the borough’s heritage. The motto is ‘Salus Populi Suprema Lex’ which translates as ‘the health of the people is the highest law’, demonstrating that we are here to serve the people of West Lancashire and they are our top priority.”

No. 308 (#10 in Lancs) – Burnley Council

Robin: “Solid work adapting the crest here, which works well as a low-detail vector. Shame about the random teal top level domain info rammed on the end, which I’d excuse as not really part of the logo but I can’t find a version without it.”

No. 290 (#9 in Lancs) – Rossendale Borough Council

Robin: “Another designer trying to avoid my opprobrium by giving me absolutely nothing to work with.”

No. 244 (#8 in Lancs) – Lancaster City Council

Robin: “Friends of mine will know I have a visceral and slightly irrational hatred of Lancaster, formed by having to make the excruciating train journey up there to visit an ex-girlfriend several times. It has the hills of Sheffield, the grimy Victorian architecture of Leeds, and the rain of Manchester. I’m reliably informed that they used to have two Wetherspoons until one of them flooded. But I can’t bring myself to hate this logo. It’s just bland, like chewing on a piece of paper. It won’t nourish you, but it won’t poison you to death either.”

Council spokesperson: “Mr Wilde is to be commended for his enjoyable commentary on council logos, although the results could have been more in our favour. While obviously disappointed at not ranking higher, our logo has served us well for many years and is a reminder to all that the Lancaster district enjoys a vibrant mix of city, coast and countryside.”

No. 240 (#7 in Lancs) – Pendle Council

Robin: Pendle is notorious for having been a hotbed of BNP (British National Party) activity back in the day – and I believe was the last place to elect a BNP councillor. Anyway, that isn’t reflected in its logo, which is a chunky and almost cartoony arrangement let down by the squished text of the council name and the slightly odd border/line arrangement around the Illustration.”

No. 238 (#6 in Lancs) – Ribble Valley Borough Council

Robin: “Inoffensive on almost every level, and unremarkable as a result.”

No. 182 (#5 in Lancs) – Lancashire County Council

Robin: “I’m not sure what’s going on with the wordmark here. It looks like it was made of gelatine and then sucked on for half an hour. It’s not an awful look, but jars badly with the very angular rose and supporting text.”

Council spokesperson: “We’re really proud of our logo. It says exactly who we are and is instantly recognisable because of our county red rose – just what a good logo should be.

This ranking is a bit of fun and has given us something to smile about. Of course we disagree with our ranking – by proudly showing off the historic red rose of Lancashire, we’re pretty sure our logo is the best in the country.”

No. 175 (#4 in Lancs) – Blackpool Council

Robin: “This is actually quite nice and a good combination of colours with a hint of contrast. The tower of people is a nice bit of illustration which the council seems frustratingly reticent to use, losing it some points on no fault of the designer’s. The stripes are a bit 2003 as well, hence why this strong concept doesn’t rank higher.”

The LDRS understands that the ‘tower of people’ element of the Blackpool Council logo was officially discontinued several years ago, but may still appear on some older council-branded material in the town.

No. 131 (#3 in Lancs) – Wyre Council

Robin: “I maintain it would be very funny if this corner of North Lancashire just ripped off the Wired Magazine logo (let’s be honest nobody has read it in years anyway) but this isn’t a bad stab at a wordmark with some nice satisfying kerning between the letters. It’s also pleasing to see they don’t feel the lack of confidence that drives so many councils towards ALL CAPS.”

No. 74 (#2 in Lancs) – Fylde Council

Robin: “The negative space windmill is a clever use of the concept but does rule this out from use against non-white backgrounds where the negative space won’t develop.”

Council Performance and Improvement Manager Alex Scrivens: “I’m surprised and delighted to see how highly the logo placed, as it’s a design we made in-house. It was a joint effort between myself and Ross McKelvie, now our ICT manager, that we came up with about seven years ago.

The previous design, which we’d been using for years, was fine but could become difficult to read when resized. The brief for the redesign was firstly to retain the windmill, and secondly to stay with green as the council colour.

“We fished around for pitches from graphic designers in the area, but nothing really seemed to fit the bill, until Ross had the idea of stripping the old logo down into its essential lines and blocks, making a clear, more minimalist and modern design.”

No. 69 (#1 in Lancs) – Preston City Council

Robin: “Probably the most overtly religious logo in the mix here, impressive considering there’s at least two places named after saints. One suspects the city’s name might be a modernisation of Priest Town, and in common with much of the North West, the city does have a fairly impressive Catholic cathedral. In any case, it’s nicely drawn with a good colour contrast.”

Council chief executive Adrian Phillips: “We’re pleased that the Preston City Council logo has been rated so highly on this list and appreciate the writer’s comments. He is correct that the name Preston is derived from Old English, meaning ‘Priest’s settlement’ or ‘Priest’s Town’. Preston is rightly proud of its ancient heritage and especially its historic Guild, which is dated back to 1179 when the then town received its first Royal Charter.

“The ‘Preston lamb’, which is significant in the logo, comes from the civic coat of arms and is very important to the city, reflecting its ancient and proud history and heritage. The current design has been in use since 2014 and was created by Prestonian and leading designer, Ben Casey, at no cost to the council.”

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Robin’s full logo list can be seen here.

 

 

From The Batman to Buzz Lightyear – here are some of the big movies coming to Blackpool cinemas in 2022

Home | Blackpool Gazette

The last of the big hitters of 2021 – The Matrix: Resurrections – was quite frankly disastrous, but there are some cracking-looking films bound for the big screen in the not-too-distant future.

 

So let’s have a look what’s coming to cinemas in Blackpool in the coming months …

Scream

Twenty-five years after a streak of brutal murders shocked the quiet town of Woodsboro, a new killer has donned the Ghostface mask and begins targeting a group of teenagers to resurrect secrets from the town’s deadly past.

Robert Pattinson as The Batman

Robert Pattinson as The Batman

Neve Campbell (Sidney Prescott) Courteney Cox (Gale Weathers) and David Arquette (Dewey Riley) return to their iconic roles in Scream alongside Melissa Barrera, Kyle Gallner, Mason Gooding, Mikey Madison, Dylan Minnette, Jenna Ortega, Jack Quaid, Marley Shelton, Jasmin Savoy Brown, and Sonia Ammar.

Released on January 14

Belfast

Written and directed by Academy Award nominee Branagh, Belfast is a poignant story of love, laughter and loss in one boy’s childhood, amid the music and social tumult of the late 1960s. The cast stars Golden Globe nominee Caitriona Balfe, Academy Award winner Judi Dench, Jamie Dornan, Ciaran Hinds, and introduces 10 year old Jude Hill.
Buzz is back in Lightyear

Buzz is back in Lightyear

Dornan and Balfe play a passionate working-class couple caught up in the mayhem, with Dench and Hinds as sharp-witted grandparents. The film is produced by Branagh, Laura Berwick, Becca Kovacik and Tamar Thomas.

Released on January 21

Death On The Nile

Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot’s (Kenneth Branagh) Egyptian vacation aboard a glamorous river steamer turns into a terrifying search for a murderer when a picture-perfect couple’s idyllic honeymoon is tragically cut short. Set against an epic landscape of sweeping desert vistas and the majestic Giza pyramids, this tale of unbridled passion and incapacitating jealousy features a cosmopolitan group of impeccably dressed travellers, and enough wicked twists and turns to leave audiences guessing until the final, shocking denouement.

Released on February 11

The Batman

From Warner Bros. Pictures comes Matt Reeves’ The Batman, starring Robert Pattinson in the dual role of Gotham City’s vigilante detective and his alter ego, reclusive billionaire Bruce Wayne. Zoë Kravitz co-stars as Catwoman, Colin Farrell plays the Penguin, Andy Serkis is Alfred Pennyworth, Jeffrey Wright is Jim Gordon, and Paul Dano is the Riddler.

The Batman is an edgy, action-packed thriller that depicts Batman in his early years, struggling to balance rage with righteousness as he investigates a disturbing mystery that has terrorized Gotham. Pattinson delivers a raw, intense portrayal of Batman as a disillusioned, desperate vigilante awakened by the realization that the anger consuming him makes him no better than the ruthless serial killer he’s hunting.

Released on March 4

Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore

Professor Albus Dumbledore knows the powerful Dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald is moving to seize control of the wizarding world. Unable to stop him alone, he entrusts Magizoologist Newt Scamander to lead an intrepid team of wizards, witches, and one brave Muggle baker on a dangerous mission, where they encounter old and new beasts and clash with Grindelwald’s growing legion of followers. But with the stakes so high, how long can Dumbledore remain on the sidelines?

Starring Jude Law, Ezra Miller, Katherine Waterston, Dan Fogler, Jessica Williams, Alison Sudol, Eddie Redmayne, Callum Turner, Mads Mikkelsen

Released on April 8

Lightyear

To infinity … and beyond! The sci-fi action-adventure presents the definitive origin story of Buzz Lightyear – the hero who inspired the toy – introducing the legendary Space Ranger who would win generations of fans. Chris Evans lends his voice to Buzz. Annie Award-winning director and veteran Pixar animator Angus MacLane helms Lightyear and Galyn Susman produces.

Released on June 17

 

 

100 years on from the ‘civic union’ of Lytham and St Annes – is it one town or two?

Home | Blackpool Gazette

It’s 100 years this year since Lytham and St Annes came together as a single council – and almost 50 years on from that authority being replaced by Fylde Council, the reference to ‘Lytham St Annes’ lingers.

 

Certainly nationally and as far as the FY8 postcode is concerned, the union which prospered through the domestic tourism peak years of the 1950s to 1970s lingers, despite the two towns being three miles apart with Ansdell and Fairhaven in between.

We asked three notable figures for their views on the situation as the centenary of that civic union approaches:

Fylde historian Peter Shakeshaft, who is a great believer in the perpetuity of the apostrophe remaining in the name of St Anne’s (punctuation which has largely disappeared from most general references), said: “From a personal perspective, the two towns, in spite of the hopes expressed at the time of the 1922 amalgamation, were already on different pathways; a divergence accelerated by the formation of Fylde borough.

A boundary sign for Lytham

A boundary sign for Lytham

A sign of confusion at St Annes supermarket

“The (at times somewhat ambivalent) contribution played by the Clifton family in the development of St Anne’s is not so fully appreciated.

“Much will depend on future developments in local government, particularly if both towns become part of a ‘Lancashire’ authority.

“Were that to happen it would, arguably, be to the advantage of Lytham residents to support the establishment of a Lytham Town Council, just as the establishment, in 2004, of St Anne’s Town Council does so for St Anne’s residents.

A boundary sign for St Annes

A boundary sign for St Annes

“That said, it would be a cultural loss if the ‘ties that bind’ were ever permanently broken.

“Perhaps it is time for organisations which function under the title of Lytham St Anne’s … Society/Club to give consideration to becoming Lytham and St Anne’s… Society/Club.”

Gavin Harrison, chairman of St Annes Town Council: “As the response to the recent Boundary Review showed, there is a strong feeling of identity within St Annes and it’s fair to say that the references to Lytham St Annes aren’t always helpful in that respect.

“There was always the possibility of confusion with visitors intending to come to St Annes ending up in Lytham (or I dare say vice versa) but in days of Satnav systems I’m sure that is less of a problem.

Detail from a vintage railway poster promoting the resort of 'Lytham St Annes'.
Picture: Friends of the Lytham St Annes Art Collection.

Detail from a vintage railway poster promoting the resort of ‘Lytham St Annes’. Picture: Friends of the Lytham St Annes Art Collection.

“I think the rivalry between the towns is friendly, although occasionally exacerbated by the fact that St Annes has a Town Council and Lytham currently is ‘unparished’.

“That might change in future if it’s the wish of the people of course. There’s also a perception that Ansdell and Fairhaven may be lost between their two bigger neighbours but of course residents of those areas also have a strong sense of identity.

“St Annes Town Council works hard on behalf of the people of St Annes and our recent events such as the September Spectacular can only strengthen our identity and improve the confidence of the town.”

Sue Forshaw, chairman of Lytham Heritage Group, makes a crucial historical point about the area, which saw St Annes largely undeveloped until 1875. She said: “The Lytham Heritage Group’s constitution is concerned with the ‘Old Parish of Lytham’ which includes both Lytham and St Annes, so in essence they have been merged long before the official 100 years.”

What do you think? One town or two, and does it really matter? Let us know what you think via social media.

It is thanks to our loyal readers that we can continue to provide the trusted news, analysis and insight that matters to you. For unlimited access to our unrivalled local reporting, you can take out a subscription here and help support the work of our dedicated team of reporters.

 

 

Fire crews called to commercial building fire in Blackpool

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Firefighters were called to a commercial building fire in Blackpool town centre on Saturday afternoon.

Four fire engines from Blackpool, South Shore, and Bispham, dealt with the incident in a single-story structure on Bonny Street.

The crews used one hose reel, a thermal imaging camera, and a triple extension ladder to extinguish the fire and were at the scene for 25 minutes.

It is thanks to our loyal readers that we can continue to provide the trusted news, analysis and insight that matters to you. For unlimited access to our unrivalled local reporting, you can take out a subscription here and help support the work of our dedicated team of reporters.

Four fire engines were called to the scene

Four fire engines were called to the scene

Tub2Pub campaign recycles your plastic chocolate and biscuit tubs to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Support

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Are you wondering what to do with those empty plastic chocolate and biscuit tubs that are a familiar sight over the festive period?

 

The Tub2Pub charity campaign has the answer and wants to recycle your plastic chocolate and biscuit tubs to raise much-needed donations for Macmillan Cancer Support.

Greene King pub company and brewer is calling on its customers to bring their empty tubs to its pubs in an effort to reduce waste and raise money for Macmillan.

Tens of millions of tubs containing chocolates, sweets and biscuits are sold in the UK each year, with the majority sold during the Christmas period.

Greene King, pub company and brewer, is calling on its customers to bring their empty tubs to its pubs in an effort to reduce waste and raise money for Macmillan.

Greene King, pub company and brewer, is calling on its customers to bring their empty tubs to its pubs in an effort to reduce waste and raise money for Macmillan.

These tubs are typically made from polypropylene; a hard plastic that is not always accepted by local authorities for recycling, resulting in it, instead, being incinerated or landfilled.

Customers are being encouraged to drop off their used plastic confectionery and biscuit tubs at any of Greene King’s managed pubs, restaurants and hotels across the UK.

See the list at the bottom of this article to find a participating pub near you.

The tubs will be taken to a specialist recycling facility and processed into granulated recycled plastic.

The money is raised by selling the recycled plastics with the profits, approximately eight pence for each tub, going to Greene King’s charity partner, Macmillan Cancer Support.

If every tub sold in the UK over the Christmas period was recycled this way, it would raise almost £400,000 in donations.

Greene King is partnering with co-cre8; specialists in creating solutions for hard-to-recycle materials and responsible for attracting large businesses to support the campaign and DCW

Polymers, which will use its high-tech plastic reprocessing plant to shred and granulate the tubs ready for sale to manufacturers, in place of virgin plastic.

Vance Fairman-Smith, Greene King’s supply chain director, said: “We’re really pleased to be able to provide this recycling service to our local communities across the country. This is a ‘win

win’ situation as we look to save the plastic tubs going to landfill and at the same time being able to support our national charity partner, Macmillan.”

“This is a great way of not just helping charity but also the environment”, added Peter Goodwin, co-cre8’s Co-founder.

“This year we really expect the campaign to take off with as many 1,700 Greene King pubs getting behind it. Clearly, last year’s campaign was greatly impacted due to Covid restrictions,

and yet despite the fact that all pubs were closed, more than five thousand tubs were collected.”

Greene King will be accepting tubs during January 2022. To check whether your tubs are suitable for participating in the scheme look for the symbol – featuring arrows in a triangular shape

and PP underneath – stamped into the outside base of the tub.

Participating pubs in Lancashire:

Cherry Tree (Blackpool) FY4 4LP

Iron Horse (Thornton) FY5 4LH

War Horse (Chorley) PR7 7JD

Parsonage (Leigh) WN7 5AR

Lea Gate (Preston) PR4 0XB

Thatch & Thistle (Nelson) BB9 7TZ

Sycamore Farm (Burnley) BB12 6HH

Greaves Park (Lancaster) LA1 3AH

Grapes Hotel (Wrea Green) PR4 2PH

Malthouse Farm (Whittle-Le-Woods) PR6 8AB

Roebuck (Bilsborrow) PR3 0RE

Air Balloon (Blackpool) FY4 2QS

Hartwood Hall (Chorley) PR6 7AX

Star (Burnley) BB11 2EG

Old Cobblers Inn (Rawtenstall) BB4 6HR

Plum Tree Farm (Blackpool) FY4 5NZ

Phantom Winger (Broughton) PR3 5JE

Poachers (Bamber Bridge) PR5 6BA

Red Robin (Wigan) WN5 0UJ

Station Promenade (Morecambe) LA4 4DB

Thornton Lodge (Little Thornton) FY5 5LD

Golden Eagle (Anchorsholme) FY5 3TG

Lord Derby (St Annes) FY8 1RG

Robin Hood (Clifton) M27 6PE

Shovels (Marton Moss) FY4 5DH

Yarrow Bridge (Chorley) PR7 4AB

Dunes Hotel (Blackpool) FY4 1SA

Fleece Inn (Penwortham) PR1 9XD

Golden Ball Hotel (Poulton-Le-Fylde) FY6 7BA

Victoria Hotel (St Annes) FY8 3NE

Dog & Partridge (Blackpool) FY1 6ET

Lane Ends (Ashton-On-Ribble) PR2 1HX

Counting House (Blackpool) FY1 1NG

Fishers (Preston) PR1 3NN

Ship & Royal (Lytham) FY8 5EH

Strawberry Gardens (Heysham) LA3 2NZ

Town House (St Annes) FY8 1SB

Dog & Partridge (Morecambe) LA4 6DE

Guild (Preston) PR1 2XQ

Farmers Arms (Blackpool) FY4 1RF

Taps (Lytham) FY8 5LE

Washington (Blackpool) FY1 3AF

 

 

Netflix Stay Close viewers confused by ‘ridiculous error’ involving Blackpool, Morecambe and Chorley filming locations

LancsLive - Latest news, sport, business and more from Lancashire

The drama, starring James Nesbitt, was filmed across the north west

 

Scenes from Netflix drama Stay Close were filmed in Blackpool

Netflix drama Stay Close has hit our screens but a “ridiculous error” is proving to be a big distraction with some viewers saying it’s made them turn off.

The show, starring James Nesbitt, came on to Netflix on December 31 and has featured on the streaming service’s most-viewed list with fans binging it in a day.

Stay Close, based on the Harlan Coben novel of the same name, was filmed across the North West including in Blackpool, Chorley and Morecambe as well as Runcorn and Manchester.

The series, which consists of eight episodes, centres around mum Megan, played by actress Cush Jumbo, and how a dark secret from her past comes back to haunt her.

At the same time detectives are investigating a missing persons case which is led by Nesbitt’s character Broome.

The book is set in Atlantic City, however creators of the Netflix series opted to give it a North West spin – of sorts, reports the ECHO.

Stay Close filmed in Manchester, Blackpool and St Helens (Image: Netflix)

Those watching the show have spotted locations from across the region including Blackpool beach, Morecambe Promenade as well as St Helens Dream Sculpture near Wigan, the Silver Jubilee Bridge in Halton and the former nightclub Shorrocks Hill in Formby.

However, viewers have taken to Twitter to highlight the “random” way that the locations have been pieced together to appear as though they are part of the same city.

One viewer took to Twitter to highlight the odd route she took.

They wrote: “Watching the first episode of Stay Close on Netflix and a character just drove over Runcorn bridge, turned right off Blackpool Prom onto Talbot Road and ended up at the dream sculpture in St. Helens. I think she needs to get a sat nav.”

While others say the mixed up locations made them turn off altogether.

James Nesbitt spotted filming new Netflix show Stay Close in rural Chorley (Image: Keith Ellison)

Viv Harris wrote: “Given up Stay Close for now after two episodes. Completely ridiculous and unbelievable, to say nothing about the random locations around the North West all appearing to be next to each other or a short car ride away.

“It’s a no from me I’m afraid, I was really looking forward to it.”

Paul Phipps added: “Harlan Coben’s Stay Close spoilt for me by inferring local landmarks such as Runcorn Bridge, Tatton Park, Dream Statue and Arley Hall are all around Blackpool.”

Danielle Walsh also wrote: “Really like Stay Close on Netflix but I’m struggling with the filming locations… they left Widnes, drove south over the bridge to Runcorn, to arrive north in Blackpool, then the Dream in St Helens and finally arriving at Rivington Pike.”

Another viewer tweeted: “There’s some big plot holes in Stay Close on Netflix. One of the characters has just driven over the Runcorn Bridge, through Blackpool and ended up at The Dream in St Helens. Not buying it.”

Derek Webster said: “Watching Stay Close but when you know the locations it can be distracting.

“Set in a mythical town you see characters drive over the old Widnes/Runcorn bridge. Then Blackpool, Formby, St Helens and Manchester. I spend most of it saying I know where that is!”

 

 

These are the incidents Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service crews have tackled this week – Monday, January 3 to Friday, January 7, 2021

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Here is the latest round-up of incidents that crews from the Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service have tackled this week.

 

We will update this story each day with the latest from the fire service:

MONDAY, JANUARY 3

– Road traffic collision in Paythorne

Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service

Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service

Two fire engines from Barnoldswick and Nelson were called to a road traffic collision at the junction of Bracewell Road and Skipton Road at around 2.40pm.

Firefighters released one casualty from a vehicle using cutting equipment before handing them into the care of paramedics.

– Kitchen fire in Colne

Two fire engines from Colne were called to a kitchen fire in a house in Varley Street at around 8.15pm.

Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service

Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service

Firefighters used two breathing apparatus, one hose reel and a ventilation unit to extinguish the flames.

No injuries were reported.

– Domestic building fire in Blackburn

Two fire engines from Blackburn attended a domestic building fire in Bank Terrace at around 9pm.

The incident involved a brazier and was extinguished by firefighters using one hose reel.

Crews were in attendance for approximately ten minutes.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 4

– Domestic building fire in Lancaster

Two fire engines from Lancaster and Morecambe attended a domestic building fire in Windermere Road at around 11.10am.

The fire involved the ground floor of a terraced property.

Firefighters used two breathing apparatus, one hose reel jet, one positive pressure ventilation unit, and two thermal imaging cameras to extinguish the flames.

They were in attendance for around an hour.

– Commercial building fire in Blackburn

Four fire engines from Darwen, Blackburn and Hyndburn were called to a commercial fire in Lindisfarne Avenue at around 6.25pm.

Firefighters used four breathing apparatus and two hose reels to extinguish the flames.

No injuries were reported and an investigation into the cause of the fire was launched.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5

– Animal rescue in Skelmersdale

Two fire engines from Skelmersdale attended an animal rescue in Middlewood at around 8.05pm.

The incident involved a cat that was stuck on a steep apex roof.

Firefighters used a 9m ladder, a triple extension ladder, a roof ladder, and general-purpose lines to rescue the animal.

They were in attendance for approximately an hour.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 6

– Domestic building fire in Accrington

Four fire engines from Hyndburn and Blackburn attended a domestic building fire in Park Road at around 4.05am.

Firefighters used four breathing apparatus, two hose reels, scene lighting, and one positive pressure ventilation unit to extinguish the flames.

They were in attendance for one hour and 50 minutes.

– Vehicle fire in Ormskirk

One fire engine from Ormskirk attended a vehicle fire in St Helens Road at around 10.35am.

The incident involved one vehicle that was alight in a car park.

Firefighters used one hose reel jet, and a thermal imaging camera to extinguish the flames.

They were in attendance for 20 minutes.

– Domestic building fire in Aughton

Two fire engines from Ormskirk attended a domestic building fire in Liverpool Road at around 6.40pm.

The incident involved the living room of a domestic property.

Firefighters used two hose reels, four breathing apparatus, a thermal imaging camera, and one positive pressure ventilation unit to extinguish the flames.

They were in attendance for around an hour.

– Vehicle fire in Skelmersdale

One fire engine from Skelmersdale attended a vehicle fire in Grimshaw Road at around 8.05pm.

The incident involved one vehicle that was well alight on the roadway when the crew arrived.

Firefighters used two breathing apparatus, and one hose reel to extinguish the flames.

They were in attendance for half an hour.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 7

– Road traffic collision on M61 southbound

Three fire engines from Bamber Bridge and Chorley attended a road traffic collision on the M61 southbound between junctions 9 and 8.

The incident involved two vehicles.

Two casualties were released using Holmatro and stabilisation equipment.

Firefighters were in attendance for one hour.

 

 

 

Lucky Lancashire Premium Bonds winner scoops £1million jackpot

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A new Premium Bonds millionaire has been crowned in Lancashire after scooping the first jackpot of 2022.

The lucky winner became an instant millionaire after Bond number 127VF63097 was selected by ERNIE (Electronic Random Number Indicator Equipment) yesterday (January 4).

National Savings and Investments – the government agency which runs the lottery from its office in Blackpool – said the winner holds £30,000 in Premium Bonds and purchased their winning Bond in May 2007.

They become the fourteenth Premium Bonds millionaire from Lancashire and the second jackpot winner from the county in consecutive months.

The lucky Lancashire winner became an instant millionaire after Bond number 127VF63097 was selected by ERNIE yesterday (January 4)

The lucky Lancashire winner became an instant millionaire after Bond number 127VF63097 was selected by ERNIE yesterday (January 4)

Jill Waters, NS&I retail director, said: “A massive congratulations to our Premium Bonds jackpot winners in Lancashire and Hertfordshire. It’s a brilliant start to the New Year and we wish them all the best for 2022 and beyond.

“We would also like to wish all of our customers a Happy New Year, with the start of 2022 being the perfect time to start a new savings habit.

“Customers can invest in Premium Bonds from just £25 and can even set up a standing order via their bank to help them save regularly and build up a savings pot.”

Another £1million prize was awarded to a second jackpot winner from Hertfordshire, who holds £50,000 in Premium Bonds and purchased the winning Bond in October 2015.

Money box shaped like ERNIE. Pic credit: Geni, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Money box shaped like ERNIE. Pic credit: Geni, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

They become the fourteenth millionaire chosen by ERNIE from Hertfordshire.

Aside from the two new millionaires, there were over 3.3 million other prizes paid out at the start of 2022, worth between £25 and £100,000.

ERNIE 5, the latest model, was brought into service in March 2019, and is a quantum random number generator built by ID Quantique.

It uses quantum technology to produce random numbers through light, replacing the former ‘thermal noise’ method. Running at speeds 21,000 times faster than the first ERNIE, it can produce 3 million winners in just 12 minutes each month.

Are you one of the lucky winners?

Premium Bonds holders can check to see if they have won a prize in January’s prize draw by using the nsandi.com prize checker, official prize checker app or their Alexa-enabled device from today (Wednesday, January 5 2022).

Customers will need their Premium Bonds holder’s number to use the website and their NS&I number or holder’s number to check via the prize checker app. At the same time, they can check for any unclaimed prizes owed to them.

January 2022 prize draw breakdown

In the January 2022 prize draw, a total of 3,352,872 prizes worth £96,395,075 will be paid out.

There were 115,674,095,010 Bond numbers eligible for the draw. Since the first draw in June 1957, ERNIE has drawn 549 million prizes with a total value of £22.5 billion.

 

Trinity Hospice Christmas tree collection set to be a record-breaker

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Donations to Trinity Hospice for collection of discarded Christmas trees are poised to set a new record this year.

 

A small army of volunteers will be out and about across the Fylde coast this weekend collecting trees from homes.

Pledges already made via the advance booking system in operation suggest the amount raised will top £24,000, shattering the previous best achieved last year.

Almost 2,000 trees are set to be collected over Saturday and Sunday and a Trinity spokesman said: “It’s our biggest collection yet, with 1,937 trees booked and £24,301 raised – that’s an increase of 250 trees and around £2,000 (on last year).”

Steve Marsh and Brian Tucker collecting trees for Trinity last year

Steve Marsh and Brian Tucker collecting trees for Trinity last year

The volunteers are covering more areas of the coast than ever this year. Once collected, the trees, along with others deposited by householders at various drop-off points, will be planted in the sands at St Annes next month under the sand dunes restoration project.

Janet Atkins, Trinity’s corporate partnerships manager, said: “We are absolutely thrilled that this weekend will once again be a record for our Christmas tree collection.

“Each year we are collecting more trees and raising more money so that we can provide exceptional hospice care to local families who need us.

“A huge thank you to everyone who has booked their collection with us and made a generous donation to our hospice.

“Our volunteers are ready with their vans for the collection, so if you see them please give them a wave.

“They do a fantastic job with this collection and, along with our sponsors Ameon and Easthams Solicitors, and Blackpool Council and Fylde Council, we really wouldn’t be able to do it without them.”

 

 

St Annes panto is back after illness – oh yes it is!

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A pantomime which was called off at two venues just after Christmas because of non-Covid illness among the cast, is back on stage this weekend at a double dose of locations.

St Annes Parish Operatic Society’s planned stagings of Babes In The Wood at St Annes Parish Rooms on December 27 and Marton United Reformed Church Hall on January 2 as part of the company’s traditional ‘mini-tour’, were cancelled.

But the panto is due to go ahead this Saturday, January 8 at St Thomas Church Hall, St Annes, with two performances, at 3pm and 7pm, and it will also be staged at St Annes Parish Rooms, Headroomgate Road on Sunday at 3.30pm.

“I hope people can join us for some great family fun,” said Society spokesman Alison Thornton. “The company was unable to perform the panto last year because of the pandemic and has put a lot of preparation work into this production.

Geraldine Brown as Robin Hood and Clara Curtis as Maid Marion in rehearsal for the St Annes Parish Operatic Society panto Babes In The Wood

Geraldine Brown as Robin Hood and Clara Curtis as Maid Marion in rehearsal for the St Annes Parish Operatic Society panto Babes In The Wood

The show is written and directed by Paula Curtis and cast members include Geraldine Brown as Robin Hood and Clara Curtis as Maid Marion (pictured inset).

Details from 01253 739235 or 07821 626121.

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