Blackpool takeaway refused over fears of too much fast food and overweight children

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The Bloomfield ward has seven times the national average number of takeaways and there are concerns over childhood obesity

The site on Lytham Road in the Bloomfield ward
The site on Lytham Road in the Bloomfield ward

Plans to open a takeaway in Blackpool have been refused over fears of too much fast food in the resort.

Proposals to open a ‘hot food’ takeaway on Lytham Road, have been deemed inappropriate by Blackpool Council, who are concerned over rising obesity rates in the town’s children – particularly in this area.

In its determination, the council stated that there are more than seven times the national average of takeaways within the Bloomfield ward and a high percentage of obese children.

Officer notes supporting the decision state: “The research shows that in Blackpool, the average number of hot food takeaways per 100,000head of population is 217 (196.5 when excluding units on the Promenade) compared to 96.5 nationally.

“The application falls within Bloomfield ward, where there are 715.14 hot food takeaways per 100,000 population (excluding the promenade) and is among the most deprived areas in the country and Blackpool borough with a high percentage of obese year 6 and reception pupils, at 24.8% and 11% respectively.

“With this in mind, it would not be sustainable to allow the development of a new takeaway in this area and the proposed scheme would be in direct contrast with the Council’s regeneration objectives for the town and its community.”

The property, which was being used as a cafe previously, now lies vacant and despite the benefit of bringing a disused building back to life – council planning officers believe there are other uses such as ‘residential’ uses which would better suit the building.

The report adds: “It is understood that the unit has been vacant since May 2020. Ordinarily some weight would be attached to a scheme seeking to bring a vacant property back into active use, but this vacancy has occurred during unprecedented times of national lockdown where movement in thisc ommercial sector has been substantially reduced.

“There is no reason to suppose that this unit could not be let or sold for an appropriate land use, including residential use.”

Overall, officers felt that the plans would be too detrimental to the council’s overall scheme to tackle childhood obesity in the town, stating that the ‘potential harm’ of the takeaway outweighed any benefits.

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