Blackpool Promenade’s Terrace Bar facing fight with planners to stay open

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It could be last orders at a seafront bar in Blackpool after councillors have been recommended to refuse planning permission for the outdoor venue.

 

It emerged in May this year the Terrace Bar, alongside Central Pier, was operating without council approval.

A retrospective planning application was submitted but the resort’s planning committee is being urged to turn it down when it meets next Tuesday (August 3) to consider the scheme.

A report to the committee says the bar’s location contravenes council policy because the area west of the tram tracks is reserved for “public realm improvements such as sea defences, transport improvements, landscaping, public amenities and ancillary small-scale retail outlets.”

The Terrace BarThe Terrace Bar

The report adds the bar is “detrimental to the council’s regeneration efforts concerning the sea front, Promenade and town centre.”

It is also deemed out of character and damaging to the setting of the historic pier, and “not of a standard considered appropriate for such a prominent and sensitive location and does not integrate well with or enhance its surroundings.”

The bar started life nearly four years ago as a portable bar surrounded by gazebos, which was set up to support a classic car show.

As it grew in popularity a more permanent bar with decking, a canopy and an entertainment area was installed with the venue attracting al fresco drinkers.
The Terrace Bar
The Terrace Bar

But when owner the Blackpool Pier Company contacted the council’s planning department in January this year regarding a separate application for South Pier, it discovered no permission was in place for the Terrace Bar.

Town hall planners say the area is “cluttered” and “does not deliver the kind of high-quality design required in this location”.

The Blackpool Piers Company say the bar does complement Central Pier, which opened in 1868 and is now owned by the Sedgwick family.

In a statement accompanying the application, it said: “Aesthetically, the bar will complement the modern facade of the pier, which is dominant, the Victorian style design of the pier only becoming apparent as the pier is traversed out to sea.

“Historic, evidential and communal value will not be unduly affected, as these will be maintained.”