Jealous Blackpool boyfriend shouted ‘she’s mine’ as partner tried to escape him on seafront

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Kamran Uddin admitted coercive and controlling behaviour

 

Blackpool seafront
Blackpool seafront

A controlling boyfriend took his partner’s phone and dictated what she was allowed to wear, a court heard.

Kamran Uddin, 22, would not let his girlfriend walk home from work alone and insisted he met her at the end of her shift.

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The controlling behaviour escalated and on May 31, Uddin assaulted his partner as she tried to make a run for a taxi close to Blackpool seafront.

Uddin, of Hornby Road, Blackpool, pleaded guilty to coercive control and assault by beating and appeared at Preston Crown Court to be sentenced.

The court heard Uddin and his partner moved to Blackpool from the South East of England.

Uddin’s partner worked in a bar in the resort.

Joe Almond, prosecuting, said the relationship was “toxic” with Uddin controlling his partner in a number of ways.

She was not allowed to wear a strappy top and was told to put a jumper on. On occasions he would take her phone so she could not contact friends or family.

On May 31 he met his partner at the end of her shift. He had been drinking alcohol and wanted to carry on.

The woman suggested they went back into her workplace but Uddin followed her and blocked her from going back inside.

The pair went to a nearby shop and bought alcohol which they drank on the beach before returning to their flat.

Uddin told her he wanted to “stop this”, accusing her of causing him to lose friends and family.

Another man who was with them called a taxi, but Uddin accused his partner of wanting to be with their friend.

When the taxi arrived the woman made a run for it but Uddin raised his arm to her throat to stop her.

Members of the public witnessed the incident and heard Uddin shouting: “That’s mine, she’s mine…”

The police were called and Uddin was arrested.

The following day, he told officers he had been drinking and accepted there had been a physical altercation between him and his partner.

He was remanded in custody and spent four and a half months in prison before his sentence hearing.

Paul Humphries, defending, said Uddin suffered depression and had not been taking his medication at the time of the incident.

He said his client had issues with relationships brought about by his own difficult upbringing which saw him placed into the care system – where he was assaulted and racially abused.

Mr Humphries said: “He accepts he uses drink to cope.”

He said Uddin was driven by jealousy and trying to keep the relationship together but now realises it was “too much.”

He said some of the behaviour was borne out of genuine concern, as they had moved to an area where there were drugs and prostitution on the street and he did not want his partner to be out alone.

Uddin, who appeared on video link, read a letter to the judge setting out his remorse.

He said: “I have realised since I have been inside that my behaviour outside and my actions were appalling. My head and my sense were not there.

“Since I have come into prison I have finally accepted I need help and I have asked for that.”

He said he had sought help for his anger issues, adding: “I can see a future. Before I was just going downhill. I have changed and I want to prove myself.”

The court heard Uddin’s former partner did not want to make a victim impact statement and had attended court in support of her ex.

She was unable to retract her statement as Uddin had already pleaded guilty.

Recorder Paul Taylor, sentencing, said: “Making your partner behave in the way you want them to behave, irrespective of their wishes, is a serious offence.”

He said the offences would typically attract a sentence of around eight months in custody. However as Uddin has already served the equivalent of a seven month sentence the judge made a community order for two years.

Uddin must work with the Probation Service and complete 40 rehabilitation days. He must also take part in a Better Relationship program.