Blackpool Council’s new literacy strategy aims to get the resort reading

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Building up some budding Blackpool bookworms is the aim of the council’s new literacy strategy, which is being launched to encourage resort residents to bury their noses in a book.

 

The challenge, part of a new 10-year literacy strategy, is being launched by Blackpool Council to improve the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills of residents across the resort.

It is open to all residents, businesses, employers and employees, and aims to build a positive reading culture through the discovery of reading for pleasure.

Families are being encouraged to read for pleasure for half an hour a day, parents are asked to read to their children or siblings read to each other, and chat to each other about the story.

Statistics showed proficiency in reading skills across the resort started to decline by the time a child reached key stage four at school.

Statistics showed proficiency in reading skills across the resort started to decline by the time a child reached key stage four at school.

Exploring words or using new vocabulary in conversation together is also part of the challenge.

Reading for pleasure is a key part of developing individual literacy skills and can lead to personal development, the council said.

A spokesman for the town hall said: “We want to see more residents reading, whether that is their local newspaper or an online review of a film they are considering watching.

“We want to encourage more of it, so we have introduced a 30 minute reading challenge.

“Attainment in Blackpool shows a picture of some challenges in the Early Years (EYFS) with good performance by the end of primary school and a significant drop-off by the end of secondary school, although this is showing early indicators of improvement.”

Statistics showed that 67.9 per cent of Blackpool youngsters in EYFS – pre-school and reception – achieved a “good level of development,” and 67 per cent of pupils achieved the expected standard for maths, reading and writing by the end of primary school.

However, by the time they reach Year 10, just 47.8 per cent of pupils achieved a nine to four pass in English and maths, significantly lower than the national average of 59.8 per cent.

A nine to five pass rate stood at 26.3 per cent, lower than the national average of 40.1 per cent.

The challenge forms one part of the town’s 10-year education strategy, which was unveiled in October last year and aims to improve prospects for Blackpool pupils.

Other ambitions include to reduce the number of youngsters expelled from schools and improve literacy among adults so they can play their part in teaching their children.

The vision is the result of a joint effort from Blackpool Council and the partners within the Blackpool Education Improvement Board (BEIB).

The literacy strategy also includes a pledge that calls on schools, colleges and businesses in Blackpool to join the campaign to champion literacy.

The aim is to establish a reading culture across Blackpool that pledges that all employers and companies will promote reading for pleasure across all ages.

Figures in 2011 showed Blackpool had a greater proportion of adults that do not have an Entry Level One qualification in English than anywhere else in the North West, and resort residents are statistically less likely to have a qualification in English at Level Two or above compared to elsewhere in the region.

A spokesman continued: “A significant element of this strategy is the notion that “you are never too old to learn,” and so there are also significant key performance indicators related to adult literacy levels.

“We must, therefore, strive to raise the level of adult literacy in Blackpool so that it is at least in-line with national averages.”

 

 

Knife crime row erupts amid sales of serrated ‘Rambo knives’ in Blackpool joke shop

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A debate on knife crime has erupted after a South Shore joke shop was found to be selling a number of Rambo- style blades.

Serrated knives, defined as 'a knife with a cutting edge, a serrated edge and images or words suggesting it is used for violence', are banned in the UK

Serrated knives, defined as ‘a knife with a cutting edge, a serrated edge and images or words suggesting it is used for violence’, are banned in the UK

The sale of serrated knives, known as zombie knives or Rambo knives, is banned under the Offensive Weapons Act 2019. From July 14 2021, it became an offence to possess a such a knife, even in private.

Despite this, zombie knives are still frequently sold in some high street shops. The Joke Shop, on Waterloo Road, last week had several serrated blades on sale for as little as £30.

A spokesman for the shop said the knives were not sharpened, and were intended to be purely decorative.

Serrated knives, defined as 'a knife with a cutting edge, a serrated edge and images or words suggesting it is used for violence', are banned in the UK

Serrated knives, defined as ‘a knife with a cutting edge, a serrated edge and images or words suggesting it is used for violence’, are banned in the UK

She said: “The police came in two days ago, and everything was fine except one thing which was a pen-knife with a Batman sign on it. We have got a firearms licence to sell firearms. We can’t sell anything illegal or we would lose it.

“Over the years things have been made illegal, but if anything that has been struck off has been struck off and are not on sale any more.

“Nine times out of ten, customers will buy a decorative stand to go with it, and anybody we have any doubts about we refuse, and we keep a register of all the people we refuse. It’s all monitored to the best of our ability.”

As well as Rambo knives, the shop also had on sale Gurkha knives, bowie knives, ‘extreme survival’ knives, throwing knives and axes, machetes, and Xenon tactical knives from Kombat UK, which advertises itself as a military supplier.

The Joke Shop on Waterloo Road/Blackpool Promenade

The Joke Shop on Waterloo Road/Blackpool Promenade

An ‘Expendables’ replica blade, a barbed wire-wrapped ‘Lucille’ baseball bat, replica guns, and a stab-proof vest were also on sale to over-25s only.

Councillor Tony Williams, leader of Blackpool Conservatives, said: “These things are sold as weapons. There’s no use for these types of knives other than as weapons. It’s OK saying you’re a collector, but these are still dangerous items and I think any shop keeper that’s selling them should think again, because they are selling something that may be used in a fatal stabbing or murder. They’ve got to look into their own conscience and what they are doing in terms of adding to the problem of knife crime.

“What I would like to see is some sort of register, like with guns in America, where there has to be a record kept of the person who purchased these weapons. But I’d rather see them not on sale at all.

“Knife crime is reducing in Britain, but this isn’t helping at all. It’s a horrible crime that leaves families devastated. Just recently, nine men were arrested following a stabbing at Ma Kelly’s/ It really brings it home.

“I would like to see a voluntary stop to the selling of all these sort of knives in Blackpool.”

The Joke Shop spokesman, however, said: “It’s kitchen knives that are used more than anything (in knife crime). Nine times out of ten, knife attacks are caused by kitchen knives.”

A spokesman for Blackpool Hunting and Archery, on the Promenade, said: “A knife, at the end of the day, is a tool. In the wrong hands, of course it can be deadly.

“I do think the age for byuing them should be raised from 18 to 25. In our store we have a challenge 30 policy, and only sell to over-25s.

“Serrated blades, there are certain ones that can be used for practical purposes, such as gardening saws. But a machete with a massive serrated edge – probably not.

“There are some knives that should not be sold. We get asked on a daily basis for illegal knives. The rules are quite clear, but they’re not well known.”

He added: “I sell some types of specialist knives designed purely for aesthetics which go for £160 or more. A person won’t spend that money on a knife if their aim is purely to do damage to somebody. Whereas you can go into Pouland and pick up a kitchen knife for £1. They are very loosely regulated.”

The council and police both pointed the finger at each other, insisting the other was responsible for addressing the sale of potentially illegal weapons.

A Lancashire police spokesman said: “From our perspective, if a visit to the shop was required, we would do it in conjunction with Trading Standards.

“We are not investigating the shop, but the matter has been raised with Blackpool South neighbourhood police team for further enquiries.”

A Blackpool Council spokesman said: “We will be looking into this matter alongside our police colleagues and the information gathering process has already started.”

Here are the knives and weapons which are illegal in the UK – and how to recognise them

Butterfly knives: Also known as ‘balisongs’. A handle that splits in the middle to reveal a blade.

Disguised knives: A blade or sharp point hidden inside something that looks like an everyday object such as a buckle, phone, brush or lipstick.

Flick knives or gravity knives: Also known as ‘switchblades’ or ‘automatic knives’. Folding knives where the blade opens automatically, by gravity or by pressing a button or something else on the knife.

Stealth knives: Non metal knives or spikes which are not made for use at home, for food or as a toy.

Zombie knives: A knife with a cutting edge, a serrated edge and images or words suggesting it is used for violence.

Swords: A curved blade over 50 centimetres, with some exceptions such as antiques, swords made to traditional methods, or swords made before 1954.

Swordstick: A hollow walking stick or cane containing a blade.

Push dagger: A knife where the handle fits within a clenched fist and the blade comes out from between two fingers.

Blowpipes: Sometimes known as ‘blow guns’. A hollow tube out of which hard pellets or darts are shot by the use of breath.

Telescopic truncheons: A knife that extends automatically, or by pressing a button or spring that is in or attached to the handle.

Batons: Straight, side-handled or friction-lock truncheons.

Hollow kubotan: A cylinder-shaped container containing a number of sharp spikes

Shuriken: Also known as ‘death stars’ or ‘throwing stars’. A hard non-flexible plate with three or more sharp radiating points, designed to be thrown.

Kusari gama: A sickle attached to a rope, cord, chain or wire.

Kyoketsu shoge: A hook-knife attached to a rope, cord, chain or wire.

Kusari or manrikigusari: A weight or hand grip attached to a rope, cord, chain or wire.

Handclaws: A band of metal or other hard material worn on the hand, from which sharp spikes come out.

Footclaws: A bar of metal or other hard material worn on the foot, from which a number of sharp spikes come out.

Knuckle dusters: A band of metal or other hard material worn on one or more fingers.

Cyclone or spiral knives: A blade with one or more cutting edges that form a spiral and come to a point.

Belt buckle knife: A buckle which incorporates or conceals a knife.

 

 

Police officer ‘attacked’ in Blackpool as cops use special law to tackle ‘disorder’

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A police officer was attacked in Blackpool – with cops using a special dispersal order to try and combat “disorder” in the resort.

 

The orders are temporary and allow an inspector to target a specific area for up to 48 hours, with officers given the legal power to clear the streets if they believe it will stop locals being harassed or alarmed, or stop crime or anti-social behaviour.

An area of Brunswick, bordered by Talbot Road, Devonshire Road, Grosvenor Street, and Church Street, was put under a dispersal order until midnight yesterday.

In a tweet, Blackpool Police said it was authorised “after reports of disorder” there, which “included a police officer being assaulted, for which a female has been arrested”.

The force added: “Please make sure you know where your children are and call them home.”

Police in the resort have used dispersal orders several times previously.

The area hit by the police order yesterday

The area hit by the police order yesterday

 

 

Flood warning issued for River Wyre as mini heatwave comes to dramatic end

A flood alert has been issued for the River Wyre as heavy rain continues to fall across the county.

 

Heavy rain has been battering the county today (September 9), with the Met Office issuing a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms.

The Environment Agency has now issued a flood alert for the River Wyre which covers Fleetwood to Little Eccleston.

Areas most at risk include Tiger’s Tail, Wyre Dock, Burrow’s Marsh, Burn Naze, Thornton, Trunnah, Stannah, Poulton-le-Fylde, Skippool, Hambleton, Cold Row, Little Singleton, Little Eccleston and Crow Woods.

The alert has been issued due to the high tide forecast at 1.45 AM on Friday, September 10.

“Flooding is possible two hours either side of this time,” a spokesman for the Environment Agency said.

“After this tide‚ the weather is more settled and no further impacts are expected.

“Please be careful along beaches, promenades, coastal footpaths and roads as large waves and sea spray could be dangerous.”

A flood alert has been issued for the River Wyre. (Credit: Environment Agency)

A flood alert has been issued for the River Wyre. (Credit: Environment Agency)

CCTV: Cyclist thrown into air in crash at busy South Shore junction

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A cyclist was thrown into the air after crashing into a car at a busy South Shore junction.

 

The crash happened shortly before 4.20pm on Thursday, September 30. It is alleged the driver of the old Hyundai-type car, a man believed to be in his 60s, then left the scene without speaking to police after he was threatened by the cyclist.

Driver Angela Johnstone, 54, was waiting at a red light at the end of Watson Road at the junction of St Annes Road and Marton Drive when her dashcam recorded the incident.

Footage shows the cyclist heading north along St Annes Road, underneath the Yeadon Way bridge. At the same time, a silver car pulls out from the direction of Marton Drive, and collides with the cyclist.

The shocking moment was caught on dashcam. Video footage from Angela Johnstone

The shocking moment was caught on dashcam. Video footage from Angela Johnstone

The cyclist, a man in his 20s, is thrown across the bonnet of the car during the crash.

Mrs Johnstone, who was visiting Blackpool from Coatbridge, Scotland, said: “I pulled over and went over; I took the boy’s bike and put it on the side of the road and asked if he was OK.

“He got up and was shouting at the old man, ‘how could you not see me?'”

She said the elderly driver exited his vehicle to check on the cyclist, but left after the man threatened to punch him.

Police and ambulance services then attended the scene. Lancashire police was approached for comment.

A North West Ambulance Service spokesman said: “An ambulance responded to an RTC involving a car and bicycle, following a 999 call at 4.19pm. The cyclist, a man in his 20s, was taken to hospital.”

Mrs Johnstone said: “I’ve been visiting Blackpool for 21 years and I’ve never seen anything like that. It’s a busy junction and I think the cars and bikes just fly out.”

Anyone with information about the crash can contact police on 101 quoting the log reference number 971 of September 30.

 

 

Blackpool’s Winter Gardens Wonderland with Christmas markets and Santa’s grotto

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There’s be a Santa’s grotto and Bavarian-style Christmas markets at the Winter Gardens

 

Winter Gardens Blackpool
Winter Gardens Blackpool (Image: Submitted)

Family event Winter Gardens Wonderland is set to sleigh ride into Blackpool for the festive season.

The wintry treat will have a Santa’s grotto and magical live entertainment, while visitors can browse the wooden chalets at the Bavarian-style Christmas markets.

The festivities will take place indoors and outdoors from November 26 to January 2.

The grotto, which will also have live reindeer, is already open for bookings, with each child requiring their own time slot.

Each visit includes a meeting Father Christmas, a gift and free photograph and frame with the man himself as part of the £15 entry fee.

To add to the winter fun in the seaside town Tower Headland will be home to a free ice skating rink, where you’ll also find simulated snowfalls, cosy log cabins, a magical forest, festive light projection shows and special Santa tram rides in the shadow of the magnificent Blackpool Tower.

“Renowned for its unique location, the Blackpool Winter Gardens is the perfect venue for a traditional Bavarian-style Christmas Market,” event organisers say.

“Complete with wooden chalets and a bustling atmosphere, Indoor & outdoor traders, prepare to be amazed as we present a fun filled event for the whole family this festive period. Featuring incredible live entertainment, amazing food and a magical Santa’s Grotto, Winter Gardens Wonderland is a MUST this festive period.”

To book a timeslot with Santa, click here.

 

Thousands of Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde families could be affected by Universal Credit cut

Home | Blackpool Gazette

The £20-weekly cut to Universal Credit (UC) will impact thousands of Fylde coast children when it happens this week, as families battle the loss of the benefit alongside rising energy, fuel and food costs.

 

There were more than 1.8 million households containing around 3.4 million children claiming UC as of May 2021, according to the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

In Blackpool alone, there are up to 9,000 families claiming the benefit – equating to 10 per cent of the working population and the third highest number of claimants in England and Wales.

More than 16,000 people in Blackpool, Fylde and Wyre applied for Universal Credit between March and May 2020, amid a nationwide surge in demand for financial support as the Covid crisis struck.

Aimee Leahy with her daughters Ezmarae, eight months, and Astarlah, two. Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Aimee Leahy with her daughters Ezmarae, eight months, and Astarlah, two. Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

But the temporary £20-a-week uplift, introduced to help claimants weather the storm of the pandemic and described as a “lifeline,” is to be phased out from October 6.

Despite the uplift having always been touted as temporary, the cut will force thousands of families in the resort into worsening financial situations.

An increase in prices for other expenses paired with the cut will throw many households into turmoil, as they are forced to fork out more money – but have less coming in.

The so-called fuel and gas crises have seen petrol, diesel and energy prices soar in recent weeks.

Aimee said the upcoming cut to Universal Credit will cause more financial difficulties for her family, despite her partner working full-time.  Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Aimee said the upcoming cut to Universal Credit will cause more financial difficulties for her family, despite her partner working full-time. Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Food prices could also be set to rise later this year, as a result of the shortage of lorry drivers and imported food checks, experts warned.

Retail analysts Verdict Research also found food price rises of meat and fish rocketed by almost 23 per cent, and fruit and vegetables increased by 14,7 per cent.

Rising bills and falling income could prove to have severe consequences for families who are already struggling to make ends meet.

Aimee Leahy, 38, of Crescent Avenue in Anchorsholme, is a mum of four children aged six and under, and is unable to work due to health issues.

Volunteers at food bank The Pantry in Fleetwood are expecting an increase in the number of residents using the service after Universal Credit is cut by £20 a week.  Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Volunteers at food bank The Pantry in Fleetwood are expecting an increase in the number of residents using the service after Universal Credit is cut by £20 a week. Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Her youngest child is just eight months old, and despite her partner working full-time at a waste management service in South Shore, Aimee relies on a top-up of Universal Credit each month.

“My partner works full time but he doesn’t earn enough, so we get UC as a top-up. He loves his job which is what really matters, I suppose,” Aimee said.

“But after this £20 a week is cut again from UC we will be left with £294 a month. We need that to buy food and anything for the children.

“My youngest children aren’t eligible for any of the childcare element of it, so we get nothing for them. My eldest child who is six wants to go to a football club, but we can’t afford to let him go.

Allan MacFarlane, volunteer at The Pantry.  Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Allan MacFarlane, volunteer at The Pantry. Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

“It’s £33 a month – and we can’t afford it. With that money, I have to pay for nursery for my two-year-old, because she isn’t entitled to any free childcare. She needs to go, it’s not good for her mental health to be at home all day. But we have to choose where to spend that money.

“Children don’t stop growing – they need feeding. Now that it’s coming to winter, they’re going to want to be at home more which means they eat more and the heating will be on more. But our energy bills rose by over £100 a month a few weeks ago. Luckily we managed to get it swapped to somewhere a bit cheaper, but everything is going up and we’re getting less money towards it all.

“I had to use a food bank at the kids’ school not long ago, and even though I was getting ESA (Employment and Support Allowance) for my health before UC, I’ve had to look for night jobs.

“But we’ve worked out that even with me working, we’d be almost £50 a month worse off. It’s just so unfair.”

Other Fylde coast parents also voiced concerns about how the removal of the benefit uplift will affect them.

Trish Bridges said: “I’m relying on food banks a lot to see us through. Can’t work with four kids, I’m a single parent. I hate relying on benefits but unfortunately working won’t work for me as I’d be paying more in childcare.”

Volunteer at The Pantry, Julie Simkiss.  Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Volunteer at The Pantry, Julie Simkiss. Pic: Daniel Martino/JPI Media

Susan Skidmore, who hoped to be able to afford to move to Blackpool one day, said: “[It] means I will be losing £85 a month, I am trying my hardest to find a job and applying for everything and anything, but will probably have to sell my car.”

As the cut threatens to plunge families deeper into hardship, rising numbers of food bank users are of concern in one of Wyre’s most deprived towns.

Many Fleetwood residents are sadly no stranger to The Pantry, home of Fleetwood Food Bank and The Mustard Seed, delivered by the town’s Church of England and Catholic parishes under the banner of Faith in the Community.

Father John Hall, from St Peter’s Church, said he was concerned that more people would need to turn to the Pantry’s resources after the £20-weekly amount is banished.

“We serve around 200 people weekly at the moment, and at the start of the pandemic we were feeding 1,600 people a week. We’re more than capable of dealing with the demand for the food bank, but I do think there will be more people coming to us again.

“The thing is, if I’m being honest, when you’re poor, you don’t get poorer. You’re just poor. But we are certainly getting ready for numbers increasing because of the reduction in UC.

“We have single people in Fleetwood on UC who will be living on just £50 or less a week after this.”

Catherine Farley, a teacher at Boundary Primary School in Grange Park, said the school was already working with underprivileged families, so the support and resources families may need to cope with ailing finances were already in place.

“Working in Grange Park, we’re of course going to see the effects of a cut to UC,” Ms Farley said.

“It’s a deprived area, but these families are deprived anyway whether they’ve got the extra £20 or not. They are used to dealing with deprivation and we already have the support in place to help.

“Schools everywhere are also already working on catch-up programmes for children after lockdown, and teachers are so busy but it’s what we do, it’s what we deal with every day.”

Cat Smith, MP for Lancaster and Fleetwood, said the Government needed to “see sense” and scrap plans to take away the uplift ahead of a planned protest against the cut in Lancaster. She said: “I will be running the London Marathon on October 2 in support of Morecambe Bay Foodbank so won’t be able to join the protest, but I will be there in spirit.

“I fear the removal of the £20 uplift will drive many more people to the foodbank as it forces them to make impossible choices – either feeding their kids or heating their homes this winter.

“This cruel decision by the Tory government will be devastating for so many families in the district.”

However, Tory MP for Blackpool North and Cleveleys Paul Maynard agreed with Miss Smith, and said the uplift should remain in place.

He said: “I understand the challenges many individuals and families in Blackpool North and Cleveleys face and how important the Universal Credit uplift has been to them. I have previously made clear to Ministers my view the uplift should remain to support families impacted by the pandemic.

“At the same time, however, I realise the uplift does not work for everyone, particularly those on legacy benefits which is why I have encouraged the Government to explore alternative mechanisms to support the financial resilience of local people.

“This includes the broader use of Local Welfare Assistance Schemes, on which I put forward a 10 Minute Rule Bill and long-term funding for the hugely important holiday activity and food programme.”

 

 

Next step awaited for repair to Lytham windmill

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Expert contractors are being brought in to restore Lytham’s iconic windmill to its full glory.

 

The windmill on Lytham Green was cordoned off at the weekend after a gusting of wind caused one of its sails to break.

Fylde Council, which owns and maintains the structure, is awaiting the arrival of a contractor this week before full cost of the repairs and a timetable can be worked out.

The council’s chief executive Allan Oldfield said on social media in reply to offers from residents to raise money for the repairs after the damage was reported: “I can promise the team at Fylde will have this repaired by the best specialists, it will not be reliant on funds raised – thanks for the support.”

Lytham Windmill with its broken sail, cordoned off with fencing

Lytham Windmill with its broken sail, cordoned off with fencing

Lytham Windmill fenced off after weather damage to sails

A council spokesman said today: “At the moment we don’t know what the repairs will cost.

“We have a contractor coming to look at the damage this week to tell us how much damage has been done and if a repair can be achieved or it will need a new sail.

“With regards to timescales, again we won’t know these until investigations have been done into the extent of the damage and the level of repair/replacement that is needed.”

Sue Forshaw, chairman of Lytham Heritage Group, said: “Fylde Council owns the building and maintains it. We are waiting to hear what happens next – at the moment we don’t know any more than it being cordoned off.”

The windmill, which dates back to 1805, previously lost a sail to high winds on a stormy night in 2011 and following that, the remaining three were removed to allow for work to repair the windshaft support.

The vital repairs, which took all a day to complete, had to take place before the new sails could be attached.

As well as replacing the broken sail, Fylde Council has also had a second new sail made at the time after another was found to be weakened.

It is thanks to our loyal readers that we can continue to provide the trusted news, analysis and insight that matters to you. For unlimited access to our unrivalled local reporting, you can take out a subscription here and help support the work of our dedicated team of reporters.

 

 

Open air opera in Lytham beats weather and boosts charity

Home | Blackpool Gazette

An open air opera performance in Lytham beat the weather and provided a boost for charity coffers.

 

Soprano Nicola Mills delighted music lovers with an afternoon show of favourites in the amphitheatre at the Park View 4U playing fields, which went ahead despite heavy morning showers.

The performance was free but a collection raised around £100 for the MIND mental health charity.

The event’s co-organiser Nicola Harvey, who organises the running group at Park View, was originally scheduled to be running in the London Marathon that day for MIND, but injury means she has deferred her place until next year.

Singer Nicola Mills with event organisers Karen Key (left) and Nicola Harvey

Singer Nicola Mills with event organisers Karen Key (left) and Nicola Harvey

Record £33,000 donation to fund vital work at Lytham’s Park View 4U

“Nicola Mills is a great believer in presenting opera for the people and was delighted to have the opportunity to perform in Lytham and was really impressed with the amphitheatre space.

“We intend to invite her back next year, perhaps in the Spring, and a Christmas season event might be a possibility, too.”

Park View 4U park ranger Julie Norman said: “Although Sunday morning started with heavy showers, we were delighted that the sun broke through the clouds and there was blue sky as soon as Nicola Mills started singing in the amphitheatre.

Nicola Mils in performance at Lytham's Park View 4U amphitheatre

Nicola Mils in performance at Lytham’s Park View 4U amphitheatre

“It was a pleasure to hear her incredible voice drift across the park which attracted an audience of all age groups.

“The crowd joined in with Bare Necessities and Singing in the Rain and we were moved to tears when Nicola sang Nessun Dorma.

“Thank you to everyone who joined us for this musical event and for donating.”

It is thanks to our loyal readers that we can continue to provide the trusted news, analysis and insight that matters to you. For unlimited access to our unrivalled local reporting, you can take out a subscription here and help support the work of our dedicated team of reporters.

 

 

Man dies after getting trapped under lorry at waste management site near Blackpool

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A man has died after getting trapped under a lorry at a waste management site near Blackpool.

 

Emergency services were called to an industrial accident at Woods Waste in Anna’s Road, off Peel Road, earlier this afternoon (October 4).

It was reported a man who was working at the site had become trapped under a lorry.

The casualty was pronounced dead at the scene.

A worker has died after becoming trapped underneath a lorry at a waste management site in Blackpool.

A worker has died after becoming trapped underneath a lorry at a waste management site in Blackpool.

“A joint investigation between the Health and Safety Executive and the police is underway,” a spokesman for Lancashire Police said.

“Our thoughts are with the man’s family and friends at this sad and difficult time.”

The age and identity of the worker has not yet been released.

Sections of Peel Road and Wild Lane were closed by police while emergency services attended the scene.

The Gazette has contacted HSE for comment.