Latest Covid community infection rates for Blackpool, Fylde, and Wyre

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Local community Covid infection rates continue to fall, according to the latest Government data.

 

The figures, for the seven days to November 7, are based on the number of people who have tested positive for Covid, are expressed as the number of new cases per 100,000 people.

In Blackpool, the rate dropped to 346.1 from 404 the week before. In Fylde, it fell to 322.6 from 544.3. And in Wyre, it dropped to 406 from 464.3.

Of the 377 local areas in the UK, 55 (15 per cent) have seen a week-on-week rise in rates, 321 (85 per cent) have seen a fall and one is unchanged.

Blackpool Victoria Hospital

Blackpool Victoria Hospital

The Orkney Islands in Scotland have the highest rate with 157 new cases in the seven days to November 7, the equivalent of 700.9 per 100,000 people.

This is up from 468.8 in the seven days to October 31.

Vale of Glamorgan in Wales has the second highest rate, down from 765.0 to 637.9, with 863 new cases.

Torfaen in Wales has the third highest rate, down from 762.4 to 623.2, with 591 new cases.

Copeland in Cumbria has the highest rate in England (579.1) and Fermanagh & Omagh has the highest rate in Northern Ireland (548.0).

The five UK areas with the biggest week-on-week rises are:

Perth & Kinross (up from 222.5 to 461.5)

Orkney Islands (468.8 to 700.9)

Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (415.1 to 588.7)

Dumfries & Galloway (334.5 to 472.0)

Inverclyde (293.3 to 429.5)

 

 

Back to the Future film fans get ready to travel in time at exclusive Blackpool Future Fanfest at Winter Gardens – here is all you need to know about the event which will feature the DeLorean and replica of the Time Travel Train

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Great Scott! Back to the Future film fans get ready for a new fan festival coming exclusively to Blackpool in January 2022.

 

Replica fan build of the time travel train from Back to the Future III

Replica fan build of the time travel train from Back to the Future III

Tickets are already selling fast for Future Fanfest – a one day event at the Winter Gardens – organised by movie prop specialists Back to the 1980s Event and Prop Hire.

The fan festival promises to celebrate the film trilogy whilst allowing visitors to experience: large fan made set builds, props, and replica vehicles including the DeLorean DMC-12 and for the first time ever the time travel train from Back to the Future III.

A percentage of ticket sales will be donated to Team Fox – the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Reasearch. The 60-year-old Canadian-American actor and lead star of the 1980s films was diagnosed with the disease in 1991, aged 29.

Fans can explore props and replica sets from the film franchise Back to the Future

Fans can explore props and replica sets from the film franchise Back to the Future

Event organiser Mike Hutchinson, a leading specialist supplier of props and vehicles from the most iconic 80s TV programmes and movies, said the event came about after building the worlds first replica of the time train from Back to the Future III with friend and fellow prop maker Ian Robinson.

He said: “This is a massive deal to the BTTF world and we were looking at releasing it to the world for the start of 2021.

“Unfortunately due to Covid, planned events got cancelled. Instead of waiting around, we decided to release the train to the fans at are own event. As massive Back to the Future fans we thought it would be great to put on an event from fans to fans. A percentage of the ticket sales will go to Team Fox.

“I’m looking forward to coming back to Blackpool after the Scene Motion Picture Exhibition back in 2016.”

Alongside the sets and main props there will be cosplay, photo opportunities as well as a “Zoom style” question and answer session with some of the cast and crew from the film trilogy.

Here is how to get your tickets:

Tickets are limited and cost £16.45 and to book visit www.backtothe1980s.co.ukVisit Future Fanfest https://www.facebook.com/Future-Fanfest-292641599212476/About Scene Motion Picture Exhibition

Scene Motion Picture Exhibition was a TV and film exhibition that was formed in 2016 specifically for an a month long event at the Winter Gardens in Blackpool.

The exhibition itself boasted numerous screen accurate TV and film cars as well as over 21 accompanied backdrop sets ranging from Back to the Future and Jurassic Park to the super hero Iron Man and Indian Jones. The scenes allowed the public to experience the feeling of what it was like to be in a movie scene.

 

The reasons why Blackpool is a great place to live

LancsLive - Latest news, sport, business and more from Lancashire

We take a look at the town’s great cost of living, sense of community and independent music scene and businesses

 

New cases were recorded in all 14 Lancashire boroughs, including Blackpool
BLACKPOOL, UNITED KINGDOM – MARCH 30: In an aerial view from a drone, the sun rises behind Blackpool Tower on March 30, 2021 in Blackpool, United Kingdom. Parts of the UK are set to see the warmest day of the year so far as forecasters are predicting temperatures of 22C (72F). With the easing of pandemic lockdown rules, many people will be heading for the outdoors. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Four Lancashire towns have been named in a recent ‘worst places to live in the UK’ list – including Blackpool.

The seaside resort has suffered many socioeconomic problems which have been widely publicised in the national and local media.

The town has a unique identity unlike anywhere else in the country however where many of its residents feel free to be themselves.

There is a thriving LGBTQIA+ along with a strong independent music scene and plethora of quirky businesses that you will not find anywhere else.

It’s also an incredibly cheap place to live in terms of food, transport and property.

The booming tourist industry provides many job opportunities from working at its world famous attractions to its world class entertainment and shows.

Here at LancsLive, we took a look at the reasons why Blackpool is a rather nice place to set up shop:

Community

Furniture created by House of Concrete, Blackpool for Counselling in the Community
Furniture created by House of Concrete, Blackpool for Counselling in the Community (Image: Counselling in the Community)

Blackpool has faced many hard times over the decades however this had bred a community spirit seen like no other in a UK town.

There are hundreds of volunteers who dedicate their time and expertise to the most vulnerable.

Counselling in the Community (CIC) on Derby Road is an amazing counselling service, reliant on donations, that offers sessions for as little as £3 an hour with around a three week waiting list which is considerably shorter than NHS. The service was set up three years ago by owner and qualified counsellor Stuart Hutton-Brown and now has around 50 volunteer counsellors including some students.

Created out of a pilot scheme which provided help to those who were vulnerable from a minibus parked up in Blackpool centre, Blackpool and the Fylde Street Angels (BFSA) also operate a weekly outreach programme and has an Emergency Bed Unit.

Services include offering hot food on the streets, signposting, basic first aid and practical help and advice.

Empowerment, based on Bispham Road, works alongside people in Blackpool and the Fylde Coast who feel they have no voice and are not listened to. The charity provides a number of services for residents of the town offering its advocacy services via the Blackpool Advocacy Hub.

A simple Google search provides a plethora of organisations that help with all kinds of issues that include anxiety, depressions, homeless, drug and alcohol addiction and many more.

Blackpool FC

Blackpool FC has some of the most passionate and dedicated fans in the country.

Referred to as Tangerines or Seasiders, the fan base has carried on strong throughout the generations.

Blackpool Football Club was founded in 1887 by former students of St John‘s School. Two years on the other football club in town, South Shore FC, was merged into Blackpool.

Some of the biggest profiles in the history of the club are Jackie Mudie, Stan Mortensen and Stanley Matthews.

History

Blackpool has a rich and interesting history arising out of interest in sea bathing dating back to the 1750s.

It was believed seawater had disease-curing properties which many were eager to try. Despite this, it still didn’t receive many visitors until the 1780s when a new road allowed people to visit from Manchester via stagecoach.

The constructions of its railway began a little later which saw a huge influx of visitors and became a haunt for “well-to-do” Victorians.

This is when its miles of golden sands became more synonymous with the well known staples of today such as deck chairs, sticks of rock and donkey rides.

World-famous attractions

An aerial view of the ICON ride at Blackpool Pleasure Beach
An aerial view of the ICON ride at Blackpool Pleasure Beach

Blackpool attractions have become so of the most famous recognisable in the world.

One of Britain’s most well-love landmarks, the Blackpool Tower, was the tallest manmade structure in the British Empire when built in 1891 boasting spectacular views as far out as the Lake District and North Wales.

It remarkable design and ornate decorations are still marvelled at centuries later.

Housing 11 different rooms it has five famous attractions including its ballroom, which has seen dancing shoes from all over the world, and Blackpool Circus which hasn’t changed much since it opening in 1894. After surviving two world wars, Blackpool Illuminations still continues to wow visitors after 140 years with big names and celebrities switching them on in late summer every year.

Known as “artificial sunlight”, ‘Blackpool lights have become part of many children’s memories and have been referenced in Beatles songs and is also in the name of one of the White Stripes’ live DVDs.

Inspired by Walt Disney’s penultimate amusement park, ‘Disneyland’, Blackpool Pleasure Beach has seen many world-first rollercoasters such as Europe’s first 360-degree looping coaster, the Revolution, the UK’s first £2 million Ice Blast, which catapults riders 210 feet vertically into the air and not to mention the Big One which was the tallest and fastest rollercoaster in the world.

Today, the park attracts YouTubers and thrill seekers from all over the globe. There are so many attractions and so much entertainment both children and adults can enjoy in the form of Madame Tussauds, Sealife Centre, Coral Island and many more.

The new 'Scream & Shake' cafe on Birley Street, Blackpool
The new ‘Scream & Shake’ cafe on Birley Street, Blackpool (Image: The Crypt)

Unique businesses

Blackpool has a unique offering of businesses that aren’t like anywhere in the country. Lurking amidst the retail shops on Birley Street lies the UK’s only horror-themed tea room.

The Crypt is a hangout for horror lovers and people who love the spooky season all year round and it has also just launched its new Scream and Shake bar in Blackpool.

The walls are literally dripping with horror movie props, merchandise and memorabilia. There is also Ziggy’s Bar and Cafe on Cedar Square which oozes cult cool inspired by non other than David Bowie.

The Fab Four have also inspired The Yellow Submarine on Rigby Road. The Abbey Road-themed entrance welcomes avid Beatles fans and those who love the 60s.

Other amazing bars to check out are Marley’s Rum bar, Cogs Cafe, Paradise Coast and Dirty Blondes.

Independent music scene

Lemmy's bar in Waterloo Music Bar, Blackpool
Lemmy’s bar in Waterloo Music Bar, Blackpool (Image: Lemmy’s bar in Waterloo Music Bar)

Blackpool has developed an amazing independent music scene developed out of a need to compete with neighbouring Manchester and Liverpool.

The town also has some of the best decorated music venues in the the world. Music maestro Jools Holland, described the Galleon on Abingdon Street as ‘the best decorated music venue he had seen in Europe’.

The grassroots music venue has earned a good reputation after its 65+ year history of promoting live music. It has served as a community hub for both local and visiting live entertainment fraternity since its opening.

The Waterloo Music Bar on Waterloo Road houses the only Lemmy-themed bar in the UK names after the Motorhead frontman.

Staff built the bar around two years ago and it is stocked with memorabilia including his cowboy boots. Detail has been put into every inch including a drum kit in the toilet.

Bootleg Social is also a highly-rated venue created by two childhood friends to support the independent music scene. Whether your a gig goer or starting a new band, you’re sure to find a place in Blackpool independent music scene.

LGBT scene

Although perhaps not as famous as Brighton, there is nevertheless a very lively and exciting gay scene mainly centered around Dickson Road and Queen Street.

It’s one of the leading gay-friendly towns in the UK.

Legendary bar in Blackpool is a purpose-built gay venue in the town. The Flying Handbag, colourful in both appearance and character, is also popular with the locals and tourists of the resort.

Plans are underway to create the first ever permanent collection of LGBTQIA+ heritage in Blackpool.

Abingdon Studios has received funding from The National Lottery Heritage Fund for the new ‘We’re Still Here’ project. The project is to document the history of LGBTQIA+ heritage in the town via people’s stories.

Education

Blackpool and Fylde College
Blackpool and Fylde College (Image: Google Maps)

There are around 57 schools in and around Blackpool with many receiving ‘Outstanding’ from OfSted.

Out of 38 primary schools, four have received this rating with top performing primary schools including Blackpool St Nicholas CofE Primary School, Highfurlong School and Park Community Academy.

There are a choice of thirteen secondary schools with three receiving ‘Outstanding. Top performers are Park Community Academy, Blackpool and the Fylde College and Highfurlong School.

Blackpool and the Fylde college also ranked in the top 3% of England’s further education colleges for 6 years running and enjoyed a 97% pass rate in 2019/20.

Cost of living

The town’ thriving tourism economy means there are always full and part time work opportunities if you want to live in Blackpool.

Not to mention being a thriving centre for theatre and entertainment which off some of the most affordable shows in the UK

An ambitious regeneration programme supported by millions of pounds worth of investment means the career prospects for graduates are increasing all the time too.

Travelling in Blackpool is incredibly cheap with several modes of transport including trams, trains and buses. A tram journey that that crosses between the two zones oin the town costs just £2.40.

Blackpool also has an eclectic range of places to eat so you can choose to go as expensive or as cheap as you like. The average fastfood meal is £5.00 and you can even get a £1 burger from the Higgitt’s famous £1 burger bar.

Blackpool is also one of the most affordable places to buy a house in the county in relation to wages. The average price of £146,466 a semi-detached house is £146,466 with terraced housing priced at £100,389.

 

 

Suspects bailed after Thornton couple are stabbed in their home by burglars

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Two suspects have been bailed after a Thornton couple were stabbed during a burglary at their home last week.

 

The men, aged 28 and 41, were arrested after the couple were held at knifepoint inside their home in Tallington Close, off Fleetwood Road North, on Tuesday, November 2.

The victims, a man and a woman in their 20s, both suffered stab wounds in the frightening assault at their home off Fleetwood Road North at around 7.30pm.

They were taken to hospital and have since been discharged to continue their recovery at home.

The men, aged 28 and 41, were arrested after a couple were held at knifepoint inside their home in Tallington Close, off Fleetwood Road North, on Tuesday, November 2. The two suspects have been bailed. Pic: Google
Thornton couple in their 20s stabbed in their home by burglars

Officers were called to the scene but the knife-wielding burglars had already fled. Following a search of the area, two men were stopped on the street and arrested later that night.

One man, aged 28, was arrested on suspicion of aggravated burglary, and a second, aged 41, was arrested on suspicion of assault (GBH).

The pair were taken into custody but have since been bailed without charge whilst detectives continue to investigate the worrying incident.

“Both have been bailed to Tuesday, November 30, pending further enquiries,” confirmed a spokesman for Lancashire Police.

Anyone with information can call police on 101 quoting log 1316 of November 2.

 

 

“Outstanding” Wyre special school to provide more places for pupils on new site

Home | Blackpool Gazette

A special school in Wyre which is rated as outstanding is set to expand onto a new site almost two miles away from its main building.

 

Red Marsh School on Holly Road in Thornton-Cleveleys will create an additional 30 places by establishing a so-called “satellite” facility at Northfold Community Primary School on Ringway. It will bring the total number of pupils at Red Marsh to 124.

Lancashire County Council’s cabinet has given the go-ahead to the plan following a consultation with interested parties from both schools. That came after a recent study found a need for more special school spaces in the Wyre and Fylde areas.

The new facility will be housed in the currently vacant Haven building at Northfold, which has recently been used by the county council for storage. It will be ready to accept pupils from the start of the next term in January.

Red Marsh School has more applications than it has places (image: Red Marsh School)

Red Marsh School has more applications than it has places (image: Red Marsh School)

Out of 114 responses to the consultation, 86 percent were in favour of the expansion of Red Marsh – and 68 percent supported the chosen option of using the Haven site to achieve it.

The remainder would have preferred to see Red Marsh expand within its existing grounds, either by the installation of a modular building or the extension of the current facilities.

Cabinet members were told that there were a “very limited number of respondents who disagreed with the proposal [who] raised concerns about the additional demands that would be placed on staff if the school were to be based on two sites”.

A "satellite" facility for Red Marsh will be created in a vacant building at Northfold Community Primary School (image: Google)

A “satellite” facility for Red Marsh will be created in a vacant building at Northfold Community Primary School (image: Google)

The satellite provision to be created at Northfold will be run as part of Red Marsh, which is over-subscribed for its current 94 places.

The school caters for children and young people between the ages of two and 19 who have severe, profound and multiple learning difficulties and autism spectrum conditions. It has been judged to be “outstanding” by Ofsted for the past decade.

Cabinet member for community and cultural services Peter Buckley – who, in a previous career, gave music lessons at Red Marsh – described it as a “fantastic school” which does “good work”.

Deputy council leader Alan Vincent welcomed the use of Northfold as a “win-win”, stating that “parking and traffic problems in and around Sacred Heart School and Red Marsh are not easy to cope with”.

In a statement issued after the meeting, cabinet member for education and skills Jayne Rear said that the headteachers of both Red Marsh and Northfold schools believed that the satellite provision would bring “benefits to all their pupils”.

“The children from Red Marsh will have the specialist support they need, while also having more inclusive opportunities.

Teachers from Northfold Community Primary School will also be able to access additional support for children with special needs from the staff at Red Marsh School as and when this is required.

“The creation of three additional classrooms will allow us to help more children and young people to benefit from the support provided by this school enabling them to achieve their full potential.

“It will also make better use of a large empty school building that is currently vacant, bringing the former school back into use,” said County Cllr Rear, who also thanked respondents to the consultation.

 

Construction begins on new sports village at Blackpool Airport

Home | Blackpool Gazette

Work has begun on the new changing rooms and pavilion at Blackpool Airport Enterprise Zone’s sports village

 

The building work is set to take 10 months and will result in a single-storey 675sq m changing and spectator facility, a 3G sports pitch, a replacement grass rugby pitch and training area.

The work at the the 35-acre site off Common Edge Road in Marton, will also involve reconfiguration and extension of the existing car park to accommodate 194 cars, as well as alterations to the existing access road.

It is hoped it will be open in summer 2022 and it will become home to the Spirit of Youth Junior Football Club, which has 250 registered players, and other clubs in the local area. The work follows the completion of the sports pitches at the site earlier this year.

Work starts of the pavilion at the sports village at Blackpool, Airport. Pictured left to right are, site manager David Gana, Charlie Conlon, chairman Michael Conlon and Coun Mark Smith.

Work starts of the pavilion at the sports village at Blackpool, Airport. Pictured left to right are, site manager David Gana, Charlie Conlon, chairman Michael Conlon and Coun Mark Smith.

Conlon Construction, which is carrying out the work, said it will create 10 full-time equivalent local construction jobs throughout the lifetime of the project. Blackpool Council has applied for £200,000 grant funding from the Football Foundation to assist the project.

Designed by Preston-based architectural, planning and building surveying practice, Cassidy and Ashton, the scheme is part of the first stage of a £28.8m investment allocated for the redevelopment of the wider 355-acre Blackpool Airport Enterprise Zone.

Over the next 25 years, Blackpool Council, which this month took over the running of the airport itself, aims to spend £70m on the Enterprise Zone to attract 140 businesses and help create 5,000 jobs.

The council has appointed a social value team to ensure local projects satisfy the council’s criteria of achieving a minimum 20 per cent social value target in all developments.

Conlon Construction has committed to achieving an entirely local supply chain, appointing 80 per cent of suppliers within a 30-mile radius of the project, and to use the development as an opportunity to upskill disadvantaged groups from the area by offering them work experience placements on site.

Darren Lee, commercial director at Conlon Construction, said: “The local community and a vast number of stakeholders have long been anticipating work starting on site, as it indicates the beginning of a new generation of sport and leisure opportunities for the people of Blackpool.

“The facilities across the new Enterprise Zone will be exceptional in their quality, but what’s even more important to us is knowing they’ve been delivered using contractors who have social value at their heart so we can be assured the project has a lasting legacy of benefits to the people of the local region.”

Coun Mark Smith, Cabinet Member for Enterprise, Business and Job Creation said: “We are delighted to see Conlon Construction start work on the new changing rooms and spectator pavilions that will deliver a transformational change for the local grass roots sports clubs using these facilities regularly.

“The first-class accommodation will make such a difference to weekly matches and training sessions, and will also enable Blackpool to attract and host high profile championships and tournaments in the future, starting with the Blackpool Cup already planned for spring 2022.”

 

 

Blackpool FC chief executive to talk to businesses about vital community ties

Home | Blackpool Gazette

One of the top men at Blackpool FC is to talk about how important it is for a business to be connected to its community.

 

Blackpool FC chief executive Ben Mansford will address a meeting of business leaders from across the area at the Fylde Coast Responsible Business Network event to be held at the football club.

The network is encouraging more businesses and organisations across Blackpool and the Fylde Coast to get involved and play their part in making a positive difference in the community.

It’s an ambition which is close to Ben’s heart, having been appointed in 2019 by owner Simon Sadler to help the successful transformation of the Bloomfield Road club following the Oyston years.

Blackpool FC chief executive Ben Mansford, who will be speaking at a Fylde Coast Responsible Business Network event about the importance of community to businesses

Blackpool FC chief executive Ben Mansford, who will be speaking at a Fylde Coast Responsible Business Network event about the importance of community to businesses

Simon, Ben, head coach Neil Critchley and their team have turned the Tangerines around from the previous regime’s days of fan boycotts and community apathy to today’s togetherness where all involved with the club are proud to share in the Seasiders’ success.

With Pool having won promotion from League One in May and making a positive start to life in the Championship this season, Ben is already seeing the positive impact the club is having on the community.

He said: “Every football club should be at the heart of its community. Football clubs are community assets for the good of the town and the community.

“They are one of the most high profile entities within any community and are responsible for a real feel good factor among people in the area.

“I think it’s significant that Simon Sadler wants to be known as the ‘custodian’ of the club, not the ‘owner’. He was very clear as soon as he came in that he wanted to give the supporters a club to be proud of again.

“He inherited a club that had been grossly underinvested in. The stadium was not fit for purpose, the staff were demotivated and undervalued and the supporters had been disenfranchised for some time.

“We wanted to make sure everything was professional, from the online store to the CRM system, and the media output. We wanted to make sure everything was more accessible and foster that togetherness.

“It’s very important for any business to sit down and work out where it is going, and how it is going to build its people to get there, and have that clear objective. Simon wanted to get promoted from League One in three years, and we did it in two.

“On the pitch we wanted to make sure we had good quality coaching, good quality recruitment and a good quality academy. Neil Critchley (Head Coach), John Stephenson (Head of Football Operations) and Ciaran Donnelly (Academy Director) are in the three positions we have put in place, the three pillars of what we are trying to achieve.

“It’s testament to Simon, to Neil, John, and Ciaran the progress we have made.

“Neil is someone the supporters can relate to. He is honest and humble. He cares. And he gives all he has got.

“He and the players who give their all and continue to punch above their weight are bringing back the values of Blackpool which reflect the town, whether that’s from 1953 and Sir Stanley Matthews, the attacking style under Ian Holloway or the one-club man Jimmy Armfield, it’s putting the style and putting the passion back into Blackpool with that hard work and excitement and flair, and creating that identity where everyone can come together and get

behind the club and the team and support what everyone is trying to achieve.

“We want to do much more, such as the training facility, the matchday experience, the fan experience. There’s lots more work to do.”

Reflecting on what aids success, Ben said that connectivity with the local community as vital for any business and any organisation.

“You can’t achieve this alone,” he said. “You have to network. You have to stay connected and understand the challenges everyone is facing, whether that’s your clients, your suppliers, your industry, and everyone across your community.

“You are only as strong as your team. That’s not just your own internal team in your organisation, that’s those in the wider community. It’s important for all businesses and organisations to understand that they are part of a bigger team, and that connecting with the community will make them stronger.”

The Fylde Coast Responsible Business Network networking event will take place at Bloomfield Road on Wednesday, November 10 from 8.30am to 10am.

Visit https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fylde-coast-rbn-network-event-tickets-179856334137

To find out more about the network contact Michelle.Walker@bitc.org.uk or call 07734 495212.

The Fylde Coast Responsible Business Network was created, and is supported, by the Blackpool Pride of Place Partnership, which is a flagship initiative of Business in the Community whose patron is HRH The Prince of Wales.

 

 

Phase two of Blackpool’s new £5m sports village is underway

LancsLive - Latest news, sport, business and more from Lancashire

New sports pitches, changing rooms and car park are part of the scheme

 

Site manager David Gana, Charlie Conlon, Chairman Michael Conlon and Cllr Mark Smith
Site manager David Gana, Charlie Conlon, Chairman Michael Conlon and Cllr Mark Smith (Image: @Jebsoncreates)

Phase two of a new £5m sports village at at Blackpool Airport Enterprise Zone is underway.

The 35 acre site is located off Common Edge Road in Marton.

Once complete, it will consist of a single-storey changing and spectator facility; a 3G sports pitch, replacement grass rugby pitch and training area; reconfiguration and extension of the existing car park to accommodate 194 cars; as well as alterations to the existing access road.

The sports facilities will be used by the Spirit of Youth Junior Football Club, which has 250 registered players, and other clubs in the local area.

The build will take 10 months to complete with an anticipated opening in summer 2022 and will create approximately 10 full-time equivalent local construction jobs throughout the lifetime of the project.

Blackpool Council has also applied for £200,000 grant funding from the Football Foundation to assist.

The scheme is the first stage of a £28.8m investment allocated for the redevelopment of the wider 355-acre Blackpool Airport Enterprise Zone.

Over the next 25 years, Blackpool Council aims to spend £70m on the Enterprise Zone to attract 140 businesses and help create 5,000 jobs.

Blackpool Council has recently appointed a dedicated social value team to ensure local projects satisfy the council’s criteria of achieving a minimum 20 per cent social value target in all developments.

Plans approved for new sports facilities
Plans approved for new sports facilities

Conlon Construction has committed to achieving an entirely local supply chain, appointing 80% of suppliers within a 30-mile radius of the project, and to use the development as an opportunity to upskill disadvantaged groups from the area by offering them work experience placements on site.

Darren Lee, commercial director at Conlon Construction, said: “The local community and a vast number of stakeholders have long been anticipating work starting on site, as it indicates the beginning of a new generation of sport and leisure opportunities for the people of Blackpool.

“The facilities across the new Enterprise Zone will be exceptional in their quality, but what’s even more important to us is knowing they’ve been delivered using contractors who have social value at their heart so we can be assured the project has a lasting legacy of benefits to the people of the local region.”

Cllr Mark Smith, Cabinet Member for Enterprise, Business and Job Creation, said: “We are delighted to see Conlon Construction start work on the new changing rooms and spectator pavilions that will deliver a transformational change for the local grass roots sports clubs using these facilities regularly.

“The first-class accommodation will make such a difference to weekly matches and training sessions, and will also enable Blackpool to attract and host high profile championships and tournaments in the future, starting with the Blackpool Cup already planned for spring 2022.”

 

 

Shaytoyia Doherty-Moore missing from Blackpool as police issue urgent plea

LancsLive - Latest news, sport, business and more from Lancashire

Shaytoyia Doherty-Moore has links to Blackpool, Manchester, Liverpool and London

 

Shaytoyia Doherty-Moore
Shaytoyia Doherty-Moore

Police say they are ‘very concerned’ about a teenager who is missing from her home in Blackpool.

Shaytoyia Doherty-Moore, 16, was last seen in the resort at around 3.20pm yesterday (November 7) and is now believed to be in the Merseyside area.

Officers are keen to speak to anyone who can help them find Shaytoyia.

The schoolgirl is described as mixed-race, 5ft 5in tall, with black, curly hair and of medium build.

She was wearing a yellow dress, denim jacket, white trainers, as well as carrying a camel-coloured handbag, at the time of her disappearance.

Shaytoyia has links to Blackpool, Manchester, Liverpool and London.

Lancashire Constabulary said following enquiries they believe she could be in the Merseyside area.

PC Aimee Richardson, of Blackpool Police, said: “Shaytoyia’s disappearance is very concerning and we would encourage anyone who has seen her or knows where she is to come forward with information immediately.

“I would also Shaytoyia, if she sees this appeal, to contact police and let us know you are safe and well.”

Anyone with information can contact police on 101 quoting log 1070 of November 7. In an emergency always call 999.

 

 

 

 

Bumpy Blackpool road that needs replacing much sooner than expected

LancsLive - Latest news, sport, business and more from Lancashire

Blackpool Council said it was aware of “wear and tear” on the road and there were plans to improve the surface

 

Waterloo Road in Blackpool
Waterloo Road in Blackpool

Highways chiefs are set to spend £300,000 repairing part of Waterloo Road in South Shore after paving slabs installed to make the area more attractive have cracked.

Cobbles laid down several years ago on the stretch of road between Lytham Road and the Promenade as part of an improvement scheme, are now due to be replaced and a more traditional road surface expected to be used.

It had been hoped the work could be done before the end of this year, but Blackpool Council says it will now be the new year before investment begins.

Ward councillors David O’Hara and Derek Robertson have both campaigned for the road to be resurfaced.

Coun O’Hara said: “The current surface was put in about 15 years ago when councils were looking to pedestrianise more areas.

“It was a good idea at the time but the surface has just not lasted. It needs to be done properly and that means the preparation work.

“It needs to look good, but they also need to use materials that are sustainable and able to take the amount of traffic.”

Coun Robertson said: “That stretch of Waterloo Road is now like a cross country road because it is so bumpy.

“The cobbles have not lasted as long as they should have done, so I would like to see it returned to a properly resurfaced road. I had hoped the work could have been done sooner but we have been told it will be early next year now.”

Blackpool Council said it was aware of “wear and tear” on the road and there were plans to improve the surface in the new year, using the “latest materials and techniques which allow us to maintain many of Blackpool’s roads in a more sustainable and cost-effective way.”

The council said the cost of repair works would be around £300,000.