Lancashire areas could be underwater in 10 years including parts of Preston, Blackpool and Morecambe

World leaders gathered at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow at the start of this month

 

New data has revealed which areas of Lancashire could be underwater in less than a decade’s time.

A map, produced by Coastal Central, clearly outlines the parts of the county that are in danger of being permanently flooded with no going back.

It comes four weeks after world leaders gathered at the COP26 climate summit; an event that is being described as the ‘last hope’ for humanity to avoid devastation.

With extreme weather events such as flooding and forest fires, the effects of global warming have become more apparent in recent years.

One of the major impacts of global warming is the melting of ice caps and subsequent rise of sea levels – and this is something that threatens coastlines around the UK.

This is concerning as Lancashire is home to a number of bodies of water.

The parts of Lancashire that are in danger by 2030:

Preston and West Lancashire

Parts of West Lancs and Preston that could be underwater
Parts of West Lancs and Preston that could be underwater (Image: Climate Central)

Preston, West Lancashire and Southport could be badly affected if the water levels continue to rise.

The red areas on the map show where the water level is expected to rise 1.0 meters above the high tide line.

Areas underwater include Rufford, Banks, Tarleton, and the vast majority of Southport.

At Preston, Avenham Park would be submerged as well as parts of Penwortham and Walton-le-Dale.

Blackpool and Fylde

The Fylde Coast
The Fylde Coast (Image: Climate Central)

The Fylde Coast could be devastated.

The map shows vast swathes of Lytham St Annes, Blackpool, and Thornton-Cleveleys in real danger.

And starkly, all of Fleetwood could be underwater.

Large areas of the Wyre district including Pilling, Knott End and St Michael’s on Wyre.

The red areas on the map show where the water level is expected to rise 1.0 meters above the high tide line.

Morecambe Bay

Morecambe Bay
Morecambe Bay (Image: Climate Central)

Quite a lot of Morecambe Bay would also be affected, according to the predictions on the map.

Morecambe could be totally submerged along with low lying land at Lancaster along the River Lune.

Heysham would become isolated and an island in its own right.

The red areas on the map show where the water level is expected to rise 1.0 meters above the high tide line.