Pensioner thrown in the air in Blackpool when he was struck by a car

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Matthew Jackson denies causing Paul Baker’s death by careless driving

 

Paul Baker died after being struck by a car on the zebra crossing in Kincraig Road
Paul Baker died after being struck by a car on the zebra crossing in Kincraig Road (Image: Google)

A 70-year-old man died after being struck by a car as he crossed a zebra crossing in Bispham, a court heard.

Matthew Jackson, 58, denies causing Paul Baker’s death by careless driving following the collision on September 22 2018.

Mr Baker suffered multiple injuries and died two weeks later at Royal Preston Hospital.

His family described him as “a Jack the Lad” who enjoyed life and attended church several times a week.

Kyra Badman, prosecuting, told Preston Crown Court Mr Baker stepped onto the zebra crossing outside Kincraig School shortly after 12.30pm on September 22.

Witnesses said he did not look before stepping out into the road.

Jackson, of Briarwood Drive, Blackpool, was at the wheel of his grey Honda civic, travelling at around the 30mph speed limit, when he collided with Mr Baker.

He later told officers he did not see the pedestrian.

CCTV taken from the school showed Jackson pull into the side of the road and go to assist Mr Baker, who was lying in the road.

Cyclist Keith Lloyd stopped his bike to help Jackson put Mr Baker into the recovery position. Police and paramedics were called to the scene.

Mr Baker was airlifted to Royal Preston Hospital but never regained consciousness and died on October 6.

His ex wife Anita Baker said: “Paul had previously had a stroke which altered his lifestyle and affected his health. Due to the stroke he had his driving licence revoked.”

Mrs Baker said she had been married to Mr Baker for over 20 years and they had four children together, although one son had died by suicide in his 30s.

She added: “Due to his health and the area he lived in he (Paul) did say in general conversation he did not want to go on. He never made any suicidal comments and never tried to harm himself.

“He wanted to go to Spain as he had friends living there.

“He enjoyed life and liked to get out and about. He was known in the local community as a nice and friendly person.”

John Bland was waiting at the bus stop on Kincraig Road at the time of the collision.

He said: “As I was waiting at the bus stop I saw a male flyying six or seven feet in the air. I saw a black car.

“I didn’t see the collision but I did see the male in the air after he had been struck. I didn;t see where he had come from but I did see he was walking on the zebra crossing. He landed about 20 feet from where he was struck.”

Mr Bland said he did not go over to the injured man as he has mobility difficulties and uses a stick, however he called emergency services and saw a man on a bike stop to help put the man into the recovery position.

Keith Lloyd said he was on his way to the Spar shop on his pedal cycle when he heard “a massive bang”.

He said he rushed over to the man and offered assistance while a woman held the injured man’s hand and searched for a pulse.

In a letter to the police he said: “On the day of the accident, at about 1230pm, the man Paul what got killed [sic], he seemed agitated, like he was needing a drink on the way down to the shop.

“15 seconds before the crash he shouted to me ‘what the fuck are you looking at?’

“He walked straight into the road without looking.”

Accident investigators said there were no defects with the car or the road and driving conditions were clear.

At 12.34 Jackson received a text message but there was no evidence he had opened it while at the wheel, the court heard.

He complied with roadside alcohol, drug and eyesight tests, which showed no problems.

Ms Badman outlined advice from the Highway Code about the use of zebra crossings for drivers and pedestrians.

She said: “The prosecution will say that the defendant Mr Jackson, driving his Honda, could not have been keeping a proper lookout, because if he had been keeping a proper lookout and had been paying attention he would have seen Mr Baker on the zebra crossing.

“The defendant did not see Mr Baker in time, and that is why sadly the collision occurred.”

(Proceeding)